My week at RPS

Roshnee Patel, MPharms Student at King’s College London

What’s happening behind the scenes? As a pharmacy student it is very difficult to understand and know what is being done for us outside the four walls of our university. My week at RPS demonstrated to me how much support there is available after we graduate but also during our studies. Fortunately, I was able to spend some time within the marketing team and I got to see it all.

From just about knowing how to use Google calendar to now being able to structure, format and schedule social media posts, my time at RPS has enabled me to develop a wide range of my skill sets. In the RPS, opportunities are always knocking on your door. I was given the opportunity to write an email to students in Birmingham. Having had no previous experience in writing emails to such a large number of recipients, I was taught the do’s and don’ts and how to template my email. Within the marketing team, I also got to witness the amount of hard work which goes into planning and preparing for anything to be sent out to the public and making sure that whatever is being sent out is for the correct audience with the most useful information. Before anything is sent to the public it is prepared and checked way in advance. The FIP World Congress next year is being held in Glasgow and is being hosted by the RPS. Even though the event is over a year away, a tremendous amount of work is currently being done to make sure the event is the best. Having also got the chance to sit in on a meeting, I saw how the RPS have and are still developing programmes to help pharmacy students from their first day till their last and beyond that as well. When we’ve just finished our pre-reg year or we’re over 10 years into our career it is comforting to know that the RPS will be there to support and guide us if we need them. It was also great to see how the RPS are always highlighting the importance of pharmacists in the community and are continuously changing themselves to make our journeys easier.

Read more My week at RPS

Drug-related deaths in Scotland 2016: How can pharmacy help?

Fiona RaeburnArticle by Fiona Raeburn, Chair, Scottish Specialist Pharmacists in Substance Misuse

This week saw the launch of 2016 data for drug-related deaths in Scotland.

867 deaths have been reported, the highest since data recording began in 1996. The causes of deaths are complex and multi factorial, however, the figures show that drug deaths are more commonly affecting people in an increasingly older age group with multiple significant health problems.  As the profession which is generally in contact with patients most regularly, pharmacists are in a unique position to help. Read more Drug-related deaths in Scotland 2016: How can pharmacy help?

Pharmacist outreach for homeless people

Richard LowrieArticle by Richard Lowrie, Lead Pharmacist Research and Development, Clinical Pharmacist, Homeless Health Service, Pharmacy and Prescribing Support Unit, NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde

As pharmacists we have a unique, generalist skill set and to access our care, patients do not normally need to go through a gatekeeper or require an appointment. This suits patients who are homeless, who tend to have physical and mental ill health and addictions, and who tend not to access preventative care. Read more Pharmacist outreach for homeless people

Write a winning abstract for conferences

Poster display

Write a winning abstract and submit for our inaugural Winter Summit.

Want to hear about the latest innovations in medicines and pharmacy? Looking to get your M.Pharm project published in an international journal? Interested in a career in academia or pharmaceutical science?

Explore the latest innovations in pharmaceutical science and research and get your work published. Join us for the RPS Winter Summit!

 

A new event in the RPS calendar, the Winter Summit will bring together experts from within pharmacy and pharmaceutical science for a programme of cutting edge topics: big data, drug development and the future of education to name a few.

Submit an abstract

Abstract submissions for oral or poster presentation are welcomed from across the science and research spectrum, so whether you have been working in the lab or on a patient-facing project, we have an opportunity for you.

  • Pharmaceutical science and early stage clinical research will be published in the Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology (Impact Factor 2.405)
  • Health service research and pharmacy practice will be published in the International Journal of Pharmacy Practice

For more information about the submissions process and guidance visit the webpage here

Get help from the RPS in writing your abstract

  • So what is an abstract? An abstract is a concise summary of a project that allows readers to quickly identify its novelty, rigour and potential impact. Writing an abstract is an opportunity to share evidence widely and is a key component of most professional conferences; it is also an excellent starting point for those new to research looking to get their work recognised.
  • Writing winning abstracts. An abstract should be a summary of a project with a clear aim and concise design, method and results with meaningful conclusion.

Join us on September 7th for an instructional webinar to help prepare your abstract. The webinar will review abstract structure and give helpful tips on judging criteria and common pitfalls

Submit your abstract by 5pm GMT on 11 September or book now to secure your place at the Winter Summit 2017.

Measles in South Wales – what you need to know

Jodie Williamson MRPharmS, Pharmacist at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society
Jodie Williamson MRPharmS

by Jodie Williamson MRPharmS, Pharmacist at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society

In June 2017 Public Health Wales announced that there were four confirmed cases of Measles in Newport. By July 24 the number of cases confirmed had increased to 10. This outbreak triggered a rolling vaccination programme in the area, with over 1,000 children receiving the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine. This outbreak was caused by the same strain of measles that has affected more than 14,000 people across Europe this year, and has sadly killed 35 people to date.

So what do you need to know about measles to keep you and your family safe?

Measles is a highly infectious viral illness which is passed from person to person via droplets which are released into the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes. The virus can live on surfaces for several hours and you can catch measles just by touching that surface and then placing your hands near your nose and mouth.

The symptoms of measles are:

  • Cold-like symptoms such as sneezing and a high temperature
  • A Cough
  • Sore, red eyes which are sensitive to light
  • Small greyish-white spots on the inside of the cheeks
  • Reddish-brown blotchy rash which usually appears a couple of days after the other symptoms.

If you think that you or your child may have measles you should contact your GP. It is important to call the surgery before you attend so that they can take steps to reduce the risk of other patients becoming infected whilst you’re there. If you or your child has received two doses of the MMR vaccine or previously had measles then it is unlikely to be measles – there are a number of other conditions with similar symptoms.

 

Treating a measles infection

There is no specific treatment for measles, but there are a number of things you can do to ease the symptoms in ordinary cases.

  • Paracetamol can be used to reduce a high temperature and relieve pain.
  • Closing blinds/curtains or dimming lights can help with sensitivity to light.
  • A sore throat or a cough can be soothed with hot drinks, particularly those containing honey and lemon. It is important to note that honey should not be given to babies under 12 months old.
  • Drink plenty of fluids to avoid dehydration.
  • Wash away crustiness around the eyes with damp cotton wool.

Your local pharmacist will be able to advise you on the best treatment for your symptoms. They will also make sure that any medicines you buy over the counter are safe to take with your regular medication if you take any.

 

More serious cases of measles

Measles usually lasts for 7-10 days and although it is often unpleasant, most cases pass without any additional complications. However, some people can develop serious, and even life-threatening illnesses such as pneumonia and meningitis. Other life-changing complications can include blindness and deafness. Serious complications are more likely to develop in children under 5, children with a poor diet and people with a weakened immune system.

Warning signs of serious complications from measles to look out for include:

  • Shortness of breath
  • Sharp chest pain that is worse when breathing in
  • Coughing up blood
  • Drowsiness
  • Confusion
  • Convulsions (fits)

If you or your child develops any of these symptoms you should go to your nearest accident and emergency (A&E) department or dial 999 for an ambulance.

 

Stop your family from being affected in the first place

The best thing you can do to protect you and your family from measles if make sure that you have all had two doses of the MMR vaccine. The first dose is usually given to babies when they are between 12 and 13 months old, and the second dose is given at 3 years and 4 months, but it is never too late to get vaccinated. If you’re not sure if you have received the vaccine, contact your GP surgery who will be able to check your records.