Pride in Practice : Being brave

by Dr. Claire Thompson, RPS Deputy Chief Scientist

She…

I’ve written lots of blogs on science or leadership but never about being gay, so this is my first professional outing.

I’m fortunate in that I have never experienced overt homophobia in the workplace. This is in stark contrast to my personal life, where experiences have ranged from:

– Being abandoned by groups of friends at school;
– Family members not coming to my wedding because they didn’t “agree with it”; and
– Strangers in the street shouting “You deserve to die” for simply holding hands with my girlfriend. (No, this wasn’t the 1950s, it was 2003)

Even though they haven’t been painful professional experiences, it doesn’t mean there haven’t been uncomfortable ones. Like every time someone asks “What does your husband do?”. I’ve lost count of the number of times I’ve responded “They….” or “My partner….” Because I didn’t want people to feel uncomfortable or embarrassed. But the longer you leave it, the more uncomfortable the discussion gets.

When is the right time?

So, when is the right time to say “She” or “My girlfriend” or “My wife”? Over the last few years, I’ve made a conscious decision to get “She” in early. The birth of my daughter really helped with this. As a proud parent, I would show people photographs and they would say “You look great for having a young baby” to which I could respond “Oh my wife gave birth to her, and she looks better than I do!” (See the photo below as proof). I find that openness, humour and a baby photo go a long way to diffusing any discomfort. Of course, there have been occasions where I have just taken the compliment (please don’t tell my wife)!

Dr. Claire Thompson (right) with her family

Brave

Coming out to colleagues still doesn’t come naturally, it always takes an element of bravery and I do admit that there are some people that I still don’t tell because I know they will judge me unfairly. Ultimately, we need to be comfortable with what we share about ourselves.
But if you do want people in the workplace to know that you are gay, take a deep breath and go for it.
Be brave. Be you.

Pride in Practice

by Sarah Steel MRPharmS, RPS Wales Policy and Practice Co-ordinator

Sarah Steel MRPharmS, Policy and Practice Coordinator

With August being the month we in Wales choose to celebrate Pride, what better time for the RPS Wales team to join the ongoing campaign for unity, equality, acceptance and embracement. To show our solidarity, some of our RPS staff members will be sharing their experiences in pharmacy as members of the LBGT community, and on the 24th of August, the eve of Pride Cymru, in the office we will be donning our brightest colours, eating rainbow cakes and flying the flag in support of Pride.

Why we still need to worry about equality

I’ve found myself thinking recently – if last year marked the 50th anniversary of the 1967 Sexual Offences Act and the “de-criminalisation of homosexuality”, why are members of the LGBT community still being tormented, isolated and discriminated against? It turns out, my ignorance was distorting my understanding. In 1967 homosexuality was in fact only partially de-criminalised; many anti-gay laws remained, and criminalisation did not in fact toally end in the United Kingdom until 2013. That’s only five years ago!

Five years ago, I was in my second year of University. Through my time at University and my career to date, I have been a proud member of the LGBT community. For the majority of the time, I have felt accepted and embraced, but I can’t say I have always felt that I am, or would always be, treated the same. My sexuality is something I am conscious of in interviews, when starting new jobs or working in new teams. I am still, in 2018, worried how people will react when, for example, I correct he to she when talking about my personal life. And I am sad to hear from colleagues and friends that they have had much worse experiences, including homophobic slurs and discrimination.

Join us and show your Pride in Practice

What stands out to me clearly is that LGBT rights and support is not a moot point, and there’s still a long way to go. The celebration of the campaign and the achievements so far is as important as ever, and we hope that through our blogs and  photos, we can be a part of the campaign for unity, equality, acceptance and embracement for all of our members. We’d love it for members to join us by sharing photos of your involvement this weekend, either at home or in the work place. Be sure to tag your social posts with #RPSPrideInPractice so we can share!

Improving mental and physical health – parkrun

By Chrissie Wellington, Global Head of Health and Wellbeing, parkrun

We all know that exercise is one way to improve physical and mental health, but it can be very hard to get started and motivate yourself to continue exercising.

I work for a brilliant organisation called parkrun which provides a fantastic way for anyone to improve their physical and mental health in a fun and supportive environment.

As a non-profit organisation, parkrun organises free 5k runs which take place every Saturday at 9am (9:30am in Scotland and Northern Ireland). There are currently over 770 parkrun events across the UK with approximately 140,000 weekly participants supported by around 14,000 volunteers.  Read more Improving mental and physical health – parkrun

How our Foundation program can help you

By Morenike Adeleke MRPharmS

Being a Foundation pharmacist has enabled me to continuously develop my practice, take into account what I’m doing well and what I can do differently or better. Finishing off the RITA1 stage of the Programme was a time of great reflection on my practice for the last year. I have always thought about my practice, but this brought back memories of some very difficult situations I have found
myself in.

The Peer Assessment tools were very helpful in terms of boosting my confidence in my daily practice; it is sometimes difficult to ask for feedback, as some colleagues may feel uncomfortable giving criticism to pharmacists directly. It was helpful in making me see the areas in which I need to grow; but it was also nice to read some very complimentary comments from my colleagues who may not otherwise have the opportunity to say those things to me.

The workplace- based assessments were initially a bit daunting, but my trainer was lovely and made me see for myself the areas in which I’m performing well. Sometimes with reflection, we focus on the things we need to improve on and forget to congratulate ourselves on the areas in which we are exceeding. Having another pharmacist there to see how I was working was actually quite refreshing and I felt comfortable enough to ask her some questions.The study days have opened my eyes to a number of areas of pharmacy that are important to my daily practice, that are not always obvious. For example, mental health was discussed at our last study day and we talked about how we can support our patients who may have mental health conditions, in a way that does not discriminate against thembut treats them just like any other patient. It’s also nice to meet some new pharmacists and catch up with some colleagues who I haven’t seen for a while! The reflective accounts and uploading all of my certificates so far made me realise how far I have come as a pharmacist. For me, that’s the great thing about the Foundation Programme.

Being able to look back on how far I have come and how I’ve grown as a pharmacist through the programme is fantastic and I’m excited because I have so much further to go.