How does the Faculty help Pharmacist Independent Prescribers?

By Rob Davies, Pharmacist Independent Prescriber and member of the Welsh Pharmacy Board.

Practice as an Independent Prescriber (IP) involves continuous learning, continuous quality improvement if you like, to ensure that practice always advances to meet patients’ needs.

I see the link between the RPS Faculty and the IP role as a virtuous circle. Prescribing helps my Faculty portfolio, which in turn helps my continuous development as an IP. My prescribing role, subsequent mentorship of colleagues and teaching contributed to my Faculty portfolio, particularly in clusters 1 and 5, ‘Expert Professional Practice’ and ‘Education, Teaching and Development’. Read more How does the Faculty help Pharmacist Independent Prescribers?

Putting antimicrobial stewardship in a global context

By Diane Ashiru-Oredope, Global AMR lead, Commonwealth Pharmacists Association

The independent Review on Antimicrobial Resistance estimated that at least 700,000 deaths each year globally are attributable to drug resistance infections such as bacterial infections, malaria and HIV/AIDS. Unless action is taken, it is thought the burden of deaths from AMR could balloon to 10 million lives each year by 2050 and cost the global economy up to $100 trillion US Dollars.

To help address this, the Department of Health, through the Fleming Fund, has just launched the new Commonwealth Partnerships for Antimicrobial Stewardship (CwPAMS) scheme. This pioneering pharmacy-led initiative will send up to 12 volunteer teams of NHS pharmacists and specialist nurses to Ghana, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia to work with local health workers to jointly tackle AMR. The scheme is now open for applications.

CwPAMS will help improve the detection and monitoring of resistant infections at the hospital level, take measures to reduce infection and put in place steps to use antibiotics effectively – all of which will help to keep antibiotics working better for longer whilst helping to stop the emergence of superbugs. The scheme is being led by The Tropical Health Education Trust and the Commonwealth Pharmacists’ Association (CPA) and is looking for multi-disciplinary approaches that involve pharmacy.

How will CwPAMS build capacity in AMS?

The CwPAMS programme will apply skills and knowledge from UK pharmacists to support capacity building for AMS in partner institutions. One important aspect of this is improving monitoring of antimicrobial consumption.

Robust monitoring mechanisms are required to help make informed decisions on where to focus efforts to reduce unnecessary use of antimicrobials, and assess the impact initiatives are having. Whilst monitoring both antimicrobial consumption is included in all national action plans on AMR, the capacity to implement this in most low and middle income countries is low. Enhancing monitoring capacity for AMS can also support building wider systems capacity and enable more effective stock control.

How will the CwPAMS scheme benefit pharmacists in the NHS?

There are important benefits for NHS pharmacists not to overlook when considering whether to apply, including:

  • opportunities to develop frugal yet innovative solutions to share with the UK 11/9/2018
  • improved leadership capacity
  • increased job satisfaction
  • improved understanding of digital technology in health
  • greater understanding and experience of working with limited resources and appreciation of the cost of resources within the NHS
  • opportunities for professional development.

How can you get involved and what support is available?

CPA are encouraging pharmacists to apply for this new and exciting opportunity. We recognise applying for grants can seem daunting to those not well immersed in doing so; the RPS are able to offer a range of valuable support in preparing applications. Contact the RPS Research Support Service or email research@rpharms.com.

CPA & THET will also be providing training for those who are awarded grants. To find out more visit the CPA website which includes access to the grant call documents. The grant call closes on 4 January. You can also email the CPA team directly via amr@commonwealthpharmacy.org.

 

My career journey at Roche

By Ciara O’Brien, Medical Manager at Roche

 

There are many parallels that can be drawn between sectors of Pharmacy because as Pharmacy professionals, we all must adhere to the same standards of conduct. For me, this has meant seeking out and building on the core concepts in my day job – wherever that has been – to develop transferable skills that allow me to confidently bring the value of a pharmacist to any role. In particular, the quality, safety and regulation of medicines speaks to the Pharmacist role of medicines expert and the provision of optimised pharmaceutical based care with the patient at the centre.

I began my career with my GPhC registration from a community pre-reg and no idea what roles were available to me in the Pharmaceutical Industry but a desire to work there. I used job sites online and this lead to my first role at Roche as a Drug Safety Associate. I was able to demonstrate the core competencies and skills I had gained on the MPharm degree and from community practice in the interview. Having the pharmacy qualification meant I could transfer skills from clinical checks of prescriptions to medical review of adverse event cases. Read more My career journey at Roche

Edward Frank Harrison – a pharmacy war hero

by Matthew Johnston, RPS Museum

If asked to list influential figures in the history of the First World War, few would probably know the name of Edward Frank Harrison. But it was Harrison who was responsible for saving the lives of thousands of Allied soldiers thanks to his work to combat the threat of chemical warfare.

Born in 1869, Harrison began his career as an apprentice pharmacist in North London aged 14. He was awarded the Pharmaceutical Society’s Jacob Bell Scholarship and won prizes in the subjects of chemistry, botany, and materia medica. He passed both the Minor and Major examinations at the Society’s School of Pharmacy and registered as a pharmacist in 1891. Read more Edward Frank Harrison – a pharmacy war hero

Setting the standards for information sharing

by Stephen Goundrey-Smith, RPS Pharmacy Informatics Advisor

We are moving towards better integrated health and care in the UK. As part of the drive to support this, new pharmacy services are useful for helping people with long-term and complex conditions to stay well in the community and take their medicines properly. This in turn means people are able to take more control of their own conditions and manage them better from home, with the support of professionals when needed. However, this system can only work if it is supported by good information sharing. Read more Setting the standards for information sharing

Palliative and End of Life Care – why getting it right is so important

Dr. Idris Baker, National Clinical Lead for Palliative and End of Life Care in Wales
Dr. Idris Baker, National Clinical Lead for Palliative and End of Life Care in Wales

by Dr. Idris Baker, National Clinical Lead for Palliative and End of Life Care in Wales

Are you serious?

 

“Are you serious about this? Who do you think you are?” the out of hours coordinator asked me. “Sending a man like this home? Asking for morphine for him to go with? A man like this needs to be in hospital.”

The problem was that Bill – he wasn’t “a man like this”, he was this man– didn’t want to be in hospital. He was in A&E, and he was screaming, and he could only tell me two things: he wanted painkillers, and he wanted to go home. He only had these two wishes and he hoped I could grant him both.

 

Bill’s story

 

His family filled in some blanks. Bill had advanced pancreatic cancer, his chemotherapy hadn’t worked, and he knew – they all knew – that he was dying. No one had given him any decent painkillers. It had got so bad that they had to bring him to hospital. We had old hospital notes and it all checked out, so there was nothing suspicious about the story. Bill was dying, in pain, and scared. I was scared too, a new young casualty officer facing a long bank holiday weekend, and I didn’t know much but even I could grasp a bit about Bill’s situation.

Read more Palliative and End of Life Care – why getting it right is so important