The Future Looks Bright for Pharmacy!

by Jodie Williamson, Pharmacist and Professional Development and Engagement Lead at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society in Wales.

Jodie Williamson MRPharmS, Pharmacist at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society
Jodie Williamson MRPharmS, Pharmacist at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society

As a pharmacist working for the Royal Pharmaceutical Society, I have the privilege of meeting the bright young leaders of the future. I have just returned from the annual conference of the British Pharmaceutical Students’ Association (BPSA) in Nottingham and was blown away by their enthusiasm for pharmacy and their ideas for the future.

Read more The Future Looks Bright for Pharmacy!

Time to Influence

by Ross Gregory, Head of External Relations, Royal Pharmaceutical Society in Wales

Ross Gregory, Head of External Relations, RPS Wales
Ross Gregory, Head of External Relations, RPS Wales

Time to Influence 

Throughout the year, RPS speaks on behalf of its members in Wales at the highest strategic levels. We do this with pride and professionalism to influence the change we want to see in health care. Most importantly, we can help improve patient outcomes through the interventions of pharmacists.   

While the issues vary considerably, one variable remains a constant: influencing change takes time. The recent publication of a National Assembly report into dependency on prescription drugs reminded us of this very fact.   Read more Time to Influence

Minding the Gap – Improving care for young people in Wales

by Ross Gregory, Head of External Relations, Royal Pharmaceutical Society in Wales

Ross Gregory, Head of External Relations, RPS Wales
Ross Gregory, Head of External Relations, RPS Wales

Minding the Gap

 

Meeting the needs of young people as they transition from child to adult services has long been a challenging issue. Pharmacists, paediatricians, psychiatrists, GPs and a whole host of other health and social care professionals are involved in these arrangements. Yet, despite the commitment and hard work of individual professionals, transition remains an area where sadly, many young people are let down by the system and where, more critically, their health and wellbeing can be compromised.

Understanding where the gaps are in the system and how they can be overcome is vitally important to provide children and young people with the safe and effective care they deserve.

 

Taking action in Wales

 

This issue is attracting attention in Wales as the Children’s Commissioner for Wales continues to push for the rights of children and Young people.

The Commissioner has recognised that pharmacists have an important role in transition arrangements, particularly for young people with multi-morbidities and complex conditions.  It was a pleasure therefore to be invited to join the Children’s Commissioner, colleagues from other royal colleges and Welsh Government officials last week to look at the issues in more detail with a view to improving the current state of play in Wales.

Read more Minding the Gap – Improving care for young people in Wales

How pharmacy shaped the fizzy drinks industry

Jodie Williamson MRPharmS, Pharmacist at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society
Jodie Williamson MRPharmS

by Jodie Williamson, Pharmacist and Professional Development and Engagement Lead at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society in Wales.

I’m sure many of us have enjoyed the occasional fizzy drink over the Christmas period, but did you know that pharmacy was instrumental in developing this industry? 

 

Soda – the fountain of health? 

During the late 19th Century soda fountains were a common feature of chemists’ shops across America. Pharmacists would create syrups, often with medicinal properties, and mix them with soda from the fountain. In 1876 Philadelphia pharmacist Charles Hires created his blend of root beer, Hires’ Root Beer, which claimed to give “New Life to the Old Folks, Pleasure to the Parents and Health to the Children”. Read more How pharmacy shaped the fizzy drinks industry

Outside the comfort zone – getting involved in politics as an RPS member

by Elin Gwyn MRPharmS, Palliative Care Pharmacist, Betsi Cadwalladr Health Board

The latest meeting of the Welsh Assembly’s Cross Party Group on Hospice and Palliative Care was recently held at on Friday 23rd November. Royal Pharmaceutical Society in Wales asked me to attend the meeting on its behalf. With RPS having just recently launched its policy on palliative and end of life care, its engagement and membership of this group is very timely.

The purpose of cross party groups is to bring together groups and organizations with expertise in a particular policy area with Assembly members who are interested in the same area. The cross party groups don’t have power, but they are used to raise Assembly members’ awareness of issues related to the field so that they can scrutinise and challenge the government and the NHS more effectively.

Read more Outside the comfort zone – getting involved in politics as an RPS member

Winter Wellness

Jodie Williamson MRPharmS, Pharmacist at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society
Jodie Williamson MRPharmS

by Jodie Williamson, Pharmacist and Professional Development and Engagement Lead at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society in Wales.

We often hear about the pressures facing the NHS during the winter months but did you know that there are steps that we can all take to stay well this Winter that can help to relieve this pressure?

Read more Winter Wellness

Pharmacy in prison – uniquely challenging, uniquely rewarding

Tom Cox MRPharmS, Community Pharmacist and RPS Welsh Pharmacy Board member
Tom Cox MRPharmS, Lead Prison Pharmacist, North Wales

by Tom Cox MRPharmS, Lead Prison Pharmacist.

Medicines optimisation in prison – the challenge

It’s long been recognised within prison populations that there’s a high prevalence of substance use disorder in connection with prescription medicines. This is often found alongside problematic polypharmacy situations.[i] My main objective as a Lead Prison Pharmacist is to optimise medicines and resolve problematic polypharmacy, to try and rehabilitate people held in custody.

Medicines optimisation within a prison takes many forms, just as it does in other areas of health care. It starts with comprehensive medicines reconciliation when people arrive at the prison. Compared with the general population, people in custody have often lived chaotic lifestyles, either on the outside of prison, or perhaps in other prisons, so the first step is to understand what they have been taking, and how they have or have not been managing their medicines.

A particular problem we encounter during medicines reconciliation is that when a person arrives in prison, they often have other people’s prescription medicines in their possession, as well as their own. This forms important evidence for any resulting medicines optimisation.

Read more Pharmacy in prison – uniquely challenging, uniquely rewarding

A good life to the very end…

Chief Pharmacist and Clinical Director of Pharmacy and Medicines management for Cardiff and Vale University Health Board
Darell Baker, Chief Pharmacist and Clinical Director of Pharmacy and Medicines management for Cardiff and Vale University Health Board

by Darrell Baker FFRPS, Chief Pharmacist and Clinical Director of Pharmacy and Medicines management for Cardiff and Vale University Health Board

A good life to the very end…

For human beings, life is meaningful because it is a story, and in stories endings matter
(Atul Gawande)

Quality palliative and end of life care is important and medicines can have a key role to play in facilitating that quality of care for many of our patients. On behalf of the Chief Pharmacists in NHS Wales, I am pleased to have supported the development of the RPS Wales policy document and to endorse its key recommendations.

 

Focusing on the individual

Understanding what quality end of life care looks (and feels) like for an individual is an important starting point. Pharmacy staff need to work as integrated members of the multi-professional team around the patient, with access to clinical information about the patient. This way, we are able to respect their wishes and support effective implementation of treatment and symptom management plans, regardless of location.

Read more A good life to the very end…

Palliative and End of Life Care – why getting it right is so important

Dr. Idris Baker, National Clinical Lead for Palliative and End of Life Care in Wales
Dr. Idris Baker, National Clinical Lead for Palliative and End of Life Care in Wales

by Dr. Idris Baker, National Clinical Lead for Palliative and End of Life Care in Wales

Are you serious?

 

“Are you serious about this? Who do you think you are?” the out of hours coordinator asked me. “Sending a man like this home? Asking for morphine for him to go with? A man like this needs to be in hospital.”

The problem was that Bill – he wasn’t “a man like this”, he was this man– didn’t want to be in hospital. He was in A&E, and he was screaming, and he could only tell me two things: he wanted painkillers, and he wanted to go home. He only had these two wishes and he hoped I could grant him both.

 

Bill’s story

 

His family filled in some blanks. Bill had advanced pancreatic cancer, his chemotherapy hadn’t worked, and he knew – they all knew – that he was dying. No one had given him any decent painkillers. It had got so bad that they had to bring him to hospital. We had old hospital notes and it all checked out, so there was nothing suspicious about the story. Bill was dying, in pain, and scared. I was scared too, a new young casualty officer facing a long bank holiday weekend, and I didn’t know much but even I could grasp a bit about Bill’s situation.

Read more Palliative and End of Life Care – why getting it right is so important

Palliative and End of Life Care – getting it right first time

Sudhir Sehrawat, Community Pharmacist and RPS Welsh Pharmacy Board member
Sudhir Sehrawat, Community Pharmacist and RPS Welsh Pharmacy Board member

by Sudhir Sehrawat, Community Pharmacist and RPS Welsh Pharmacy Board member.

 

Getting it right – first time.

 

In every day working life we strive to get things right so we achieve the results that people need. It saves time, avoids duplication of effort and you get the result you want. Yet, as a community pharmacist, I see palliative care as an area where we sometimes don’t get things right first time due to the complexity of the systems and processes involved.

 

What happens when we get it wrong

 

In a real life scenario I was presented with a prescription by a patient’s relative for end of life medication on a Saturday morning. The medication prescribed was not on the Health Board Palliative Care Formulary and the family had spent most of the previous day travelling to various community pharmacies to get the prescription dispensed. I contacted the out-of-hours GP explaining the situation and the relative was asked to attend the out-of-hours service for a new prescription. They returned after lunch with a new prescription, however, the hand written prescription did not meet the controlled drugs regulations. I contacted the out-of-hours service again and the family member was asked to pick up a new prescription and return to the pharmacy. The controlled drug was supplied in part due to limited stock held but was enough to last until Monday evening. I explained we could order the remaining stock and deliver it when it arrived. After work on Monday evening I visited the patient’s address with the remaining medication only to discover the patient had sadly, already passed away on Saturday evening.

When a patient is at end of life members of the family and friends need to be with their loved ones, not chasing supplies of medication.

There’s lots to consider within this one real life scenario.

  • Why was a non-formulary palliative care medication prescribed?
  • Why was the alternative controlled drug prescription not written correctly?
  • Where were the communication channels to let the community pharmacy know the patient had passed away?

This single case is typical and highlights multiple opportunities to improve care at the end of life.

 

Getting it right in future

 

I welcome the upcoming policy on palliative and end of life care by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society in Wales. This leading policy will address the issues we healthcare professionals face and importantly, allows patients high quality coordinated care. Patients and carers have the right to be treated with dignity and respect. The policy outlines key areas to ensure patient empowerment through timely access to medication, providing the right support through shared health care plans and offering education and training to the workforce.

If we work on an All Wales approach and implement the key recommendations of the policy, we have the opportunity to drive quality improvements as well as reduce demands on our health and social care services. I’m fully behind the policy as I hope many of you reading this blog will be. Lets get it right – first time.

 

RPS new Palliative and End of Life Care policy for Wales will be published at the end of November, and launched at the RPS Medicines Safety Conference in Cardiff on November 22.