Supporting and managing diabetes among the South Asian diaspora

How the pharmacy profession can play a huge role in providing effective support and care

Diabetes and the population

Type 2 diabetes is a preventable long-term condition which is currently highly prevalent and steadily increasing.

Research has shown that some ethnicities are at higher risk for developing the condition. South Asian people make up the second largest ethnic group in the UK, after the white population, and are at an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes in comparison. With the condition being up to six times more common in this ethnic group, it is a growing problem in the community.

“It is important that culturally appropriate advice is provided to those of South Asian origin”

The average age of onset in this group is 25, as opposed to 40 in the White population. There are a number of health complications related to diabetes, which include cardiovascular risk and mental health. It is therefore important that culturally appropriate advice is provided to those of South Asian origin, including advice about fasting, diet and exercise.

Read more Supporting and managing diabetes among the South Asian diaspora

Learning from failures of care at Gosport

Catherine Picton, Professional Secretary, RPS Hospital Expert Advisory Group

At least 450 patients are thought to have died after the administration of inappropriately high doses of opioids between 1988 and 2000 at Gosport War Memorial Hospital. In June 2018 the report of the Gosport Independent Panel into failures of care was published.

Like many reading the report I was shocked. Most sobering was that this practice remained unchallenged for a prolonged period of time, despite initial concerns being raised by relatives of patients and nursing staff, and prescribing being outside accepted good practice.

Read more Learning from failures of care at Gosport

Volunteering at FIP 2018

Elisa Lee, Fourth Year MPharm student at Robert Gordon University 

What I did

I was one of the few fortunate students who was elected as a volunteer for the 78th FIP world congress in Glasgow 2018.

I started my volunteering a few days before the event, along with other student volunteers from all over UK, where we were split into different working areas. These included FIP booth, press and speaker room, accreditation and registration, and poster session. On the first two days we helped set up the exhibition hall, work stations, equipment and helped pack badges.

I was part of the accreditation and registration group for the duration of the congress. My role consisted of handing out evaluation forms, recording any filled-out forms on excel and answering any questions regarding accreditation. I also helped at the registration desk, helping participants collect their membership badges, handing out programmes and helping with any other general enquiries. Read more Volunteering at FIP 2018

Why should you attend the ‘Women in Leadership: Survive and Thrive’?

by Emma Davies, Advanced Pharmacist Practitioner and Research Fellow at Swansea University.

Women form the majority of the pharmacy workforce and yet, are still under-represented in senior roles across all sectors. This Women in Leadership event is looking to explore some of the issues faced by women working in healthcare and how we can work together to overcome them.

My contribution

I am looking to share my experience of workplace bullying and how I have tried to turn negative experiences into motivation to succeed. I am hoping that by being open about what I have faced, it will encourage people who may be going through a similar experience to know that it doesn’t have to continue or prevent them from realising their potential. I am looking forward to hearing from attendees about how they might have dealt with similar experiences and what I can learn from that to strengthen my future and those I support.  Read more Why should you attend the ‘Women in Leadership: Survive and Thrive’?

Sharpen your influencing skills: learn the art of debate

Catriona Bradley from the Irish Institute of Pharmacy

Have you ever had to justify a professional decision? Did your influencing skills fall short? FIP has invited experts in the art of debating to consider an issue at the heart of the pharmacy profession – continuing professional development – and to help congress participants understand and acquire the skills needed to debate effectively.

“As pharmacists, it’s important that we’re able to look at any argument or any proposal about our profession from [different] viewpoints and to be able to set aside our own believes and values,” says Catriona Bradley, of the Irish Institute of Pharmacy, Ireland. Read more Sharpen your influencing skills: learn the art of debate

The important thing to remember is: VOTE!

by Chris Bonsell, Locum Pharmacist and RPS West Yorkshire Steering Group Member

Benjamin Franklin once mused ‘Nothing can be certain, except death and taxes’. If he was alive today he might have included: …and nothing can be certain in the outcome of this year’s English Pharmacy Board elections! This year we see 14 nominations for only four substantive vacancies to the EPB.

Pharmacy has been going through great change for many years and the way we work is very different now from 10 years ago or even 5 years ago. Pharmacists are now more clinically focused, working in new and emerging roles and are leaders within systems and organisations which at one time would have seemed unthinkable. We play a more pivotal role in patient-centred care, educating the public and in the prevention of disease.

Members of the EPB have a responsibility to be effective in their representation of all pharmacists across all sectors and to be vanguards of the profession. They should be inspirational not only to those who elected them but also to pharmacists throughout the country still to join the Royal Pharmaceutical Society. Read more The important thing to remember is: VOTE!

Transforming outcomes: How pharmacy can play its part

Ahead of the 2018 FIP World Congress of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences in Glasgow, Scotland, Harriet Pike speaks to some of the key players behind the congress programme to find out what’s in store.

Wherever you practise, patients’ needs are changing. Advances in science and technology mean that individualised treatments can offer better outcomes than a “one-size-fits-all” approach. But there are challenges: new technologies often come with a hefty price tag, adding to the huge financial pressures already faced by health systems; practitioners are increasingly expected to emerge from their professional silos to collaborate for the benefit of patients; and the health workforce is not always a predictable resource.

The International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) wants pharmacists to be part of the solution. “It is the responsibility of each of us to transform and advance the profession to improve the health of our patients and nations,” says Lars-Åke Söderlund, head of national customers and new businesses at Apoteket AB, Sweden, and a member of the 2018 World Congress of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences programme committee. Read more Transforming outcomes: How pharmacy can play its part

Changing the way pharmacists learn

 Ahead of the 2018 FIP World Congress of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences in Glasgow, Scotland, Harriet Pike speaks to educators who are transforming the way pharmacists learn.

In the classrooms of The University of Sydney, Australia, students from a broad range of health disciplines are working together to solve complex, authentic, clinical cases. Medical trainees collaborate with diagnostic radiography students, who in turn discuss a patient’s drug history with pharmacy students, among others, each relying on the unique knowledge and skills of their peers.

Interprofessional education, while logistically difficult to organise, is an essential component of a health professional’s training, according to Timothy Chen, professor of medication management at the university and an interprofessional education champion. “To get the best outcomes for our patients, healthcare professionals must be able to work effectively in teams,” says Professor Chen, who will share his experiences of this way of learning at the 2018 FIP congress in Glasgow, Scotland. “Transforming outcomes” is the theme of the congress, to be held from 2 to 6 September, which will capture innovations in education that are helping pharmacists practise at the top of their game.

Interprofessional education makes perfect sense: as populations age and health interventions become increasingly complex, teams of specialists will be needed to affect the best outcomes for patients. And while pharmacists are already working in multidisciplinary environments, team work can be complex and complicated and does not necessarily come naturally.

Read more Changing the way pharmacists learn

My experience as an RPS English Pharmacy Board member

Sharon Buckle is Vice Chair of the RPS English Pharmacy Board and a Pharmacy Manager for Boots.

In June 2012 I was delighted to be elected onto the English Pharmacy Board. I was so honoured and so determined that we would be a bold, decisive and happening board, making a difference for our Profession.

If I could sum up in 3 words what is required of a board member, I would cite three characteristics:

  • Passionate
  • Persistent
  • Pragmatic

I made 3 pre-election pledges:
1/ to push for the sharing of patient records with pharmacists
2/ to fight for decriminalisation of single dispensing errors
3/ to raise the profile of pharmacists with Government, politicians and medics

In 2018 we are well on the way to delivering all three! Read more My experience as an RPS English Pharmacy Board member

No you don’t need a PhD to pursue a career in the Pharmaceutical Industry!

Professor Luigi G Martini FRPharmS, FEIPG, Chief Pharmaceutical Scientist for the Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

Nor do you need to have done an Industrial pre-registration programme either! These are the two most commonly cited questions, or should I say myths, which are often directed at me.

So I have taken the opportunity in this blog to dispel a few myths as follows:

1) You do not need to have a PhD to work in industry, but it does help if you want to work in Research and Drug Discovery. However, there are many roles in Product Development, Manufacturing and Commercial which exist for pharmacists.

2) You do not need to undertake a pre-registration year in industry, and with only 11 such programmes in the UK, they are highly competitive and thus restricted with respect to demand. In fact, pharmacists who have trained and worked in community and hospital are highly regarded by the industry.

3) There has never been a better time to join the industry with pharmacists being highly desired for career paths in Medical Affairs, Regulatory Affairs, Pharmacovigilance and Quality Assurance.

Read more No you don’t need a PhD to pursue a career in the Pharmaceutical Industry!