General Election 2019 – A bright future for pharmacy?

By Sandra Gidley, RPS President

The NHS has become a key political battlefield and is featuring prominently in party political manifestos. With the election just a week away, what’s being promised by the parties and what does the future hold for pharmacy?

No crystal ball

We want to ensure that the role of pharmacists and the wider profession in delivering safe and effective healthcare becomes a central tenet of health policy. Our manifesto sets out some of our key campaigns such as patient safety, medicine shortages and growing pressures on the workforce.

We want the next UK Government to invest in pharmacy to maximise its contribution to healthcare. We want to see patient access to medicines secured in a complex global market and a clear future relationship with the EU (and the rest of the rest of the world) to make this happen.

Greater investment in the training and education of pharmacists is also vital. We have made it clear that this should be a key element of any future workforce strategy. We also want to ensure that patients benefit from advances in medicines and therapies. With growing pressures on workforce, the next government must expand health and wellbeing support to pharmacists and all health professionals delivering NHS services.

Positive signs

The political party manifestos offer some hope in achieving our calls to action and for delivering on key issues that we have long campaigned for. Our call to scrap prescription charges in England in line with Scotland and Wales is being echoed in the current political battles. Recognition of the pharmacy workforce across the NHS and particularly in primary care has emerged as a key health policy issue. Acknowledgement of evidence-based medicines and harnessing the potential of new medicinal products is also featuring in political dialogue in the run up to the election.

For further information about the pledges being made on healthcare by the main political parties, please see our handy summary guide.

Your voice counts

The clock is ticking but there is still time to have your voice heard. Why not encourage election candidates to show their support for pharmacy by using the RPS general election toolkit? Get in touch with your local candidates and invite them to a pharmacy visit to discuss the future role of pharmacy. You could also get involved in the social media conversations about the election, look out for #votepharmacy.

This election is a vitally important one. It is crucial that the main political parties back and support pharmacists and pharmacy services. As a pharmacist, please do make your voice heard and together, lets create a bright future for pharmacy.  

General Election 2019 – The Party Manifestos

by Jonathan Bisby

Like with any general election, the NHS is always a key battleground. Promises on healthcare from the political parties in their recently published manifestos has grabbed headlines as they attempt to secure votes. Here are some of the main manifesto promises that the Conservatives, Labour, Liberal Democrats and other parties have made during this year’s election campaign:

Funding

Conservatives

  • £34 billion extra funding a year for the NHS by 2023-24
  • £750 million a year funding to provide 50,000 more nurses in the next parliament
  • Maintenance grants of between £5,000 and £8,000 a year for student nurses

Labour

  • A pledge to spend £28 for every pound that the Conservatives have pledged
  • Increase expenditure across the health sector by an average of 4.3% a year
  • A promise of a ‘lifetime cap’ on personal contributions towards care costs

Liberal Democrats

  • £7 billion additional funding to the NHS
  • A penny on income tax for the NHS and raise £35bn to spend on the NHS and social care
  • Bursaries for nursing students studying specialties where shortages are most acute

Access to services and medicines

Conservatives

  • Upgrades on six hospitals by 2025 and a commitment to start building new ones over the next decade
  • Free hospital parking in England for NHS staff and some patients
  • A commitment to make the UK the leading global hub for life sciences after Brexit and to work collaboratively internationally and with the EU on scientific research, including Horizon

Labour

  • Abolish prescription charges in England
  • Establish a generic drug company to improve fair prices on medicines
  • They have promised to stabilise overstretched A&E departments and improve stroke, heart disease and cancer survival rates by providing earlier diagnosis and improved screening rates
  • Progress the clinically appropriate prescription of medicinal cannabis

Liberal Democrats

  • £10 billion capital fund to upgrade facilities and equipment in hospitals and NHS buildings
  • A pledge to increase mental health services and provisions and reduce waiting times for these services by reforming the Health and Social Care Act and end what they call automatic tendering of health services
  • They will increase access to medicinal drugs on prescription, such as medicinal cannabis, drawing on international evidence to establish a clear evidence base for research in the UK

Workforce

Conservatives

  • A commitment to increase the number of GP posts from 3,500 to 4,000 from 2021/22 and create an extra 50 million appointments in general practice by 2024/25.
  • NHS Visa for trained nurses and other health professionals coming into the country to make it easier to enter, but no similar pledge to social care
  • Delivery of the NHS People Plan with a commitment to recruit 6,000 more health professionals into primary care, which includes pharmacists, retain skilled workers within the current workforce and improve staff morale

Labour

  • Pledge to ensure that community pharmacy is supported
  • They will increase of 5,000 fully qualifies GPs into the NHS
  • Create an NHS working environment that is ‘safe, flexible and free from harassment, bullying or violence’

Liberal Democrats

  • Retain free movement of workers by preventing the UK from leaving the European Union and supporting the current European GP workforce and attract more GPs to work in this country
  • End the shortfall of GPs by 2025, pharmacy was mentioned as a profession which they will make greater appropriate use of
  • Expand GP training places to 5,000 by the end of the next parliament

The Scottish National Party is calling for the next government to invest significantly in the NHS and have promised to boost Scotland’s budget for the NHS by £4 billion over the course of the next Parliament. They will also introduce the NHS Protection Act, which they say will protect the health service from any future trade deals in Scotland.

In Wales, Plaid Cymru are planning for an overhaul of healthcare and have pledged to provide 1,000 extra doctors, 5,000 nurses and 100 dentists to be trained and integrated into the Welsh NHS. They are also calling for free social care at the point of need for elder people in society, estimating that this will cost the Welsh Government £300 million a year. A 5% increase pledge in mental health spending over the next decade is also a significant announcement.

The Green Party have also announced that they will increase funding to the NHS by at least £6 billion each year until 2030 and ensure that mental health care is put on an equal footing with physical health care. They will add a further £1 billion a year into nursing education, as well as reinstating nursing bursaries for students.

We are calling for the political parties to support pharmacy. Take a look at the RPS General Election Toolkit and our general election blog. This is an opportunity for you to have your say and help make the voice of the profession heard.

Just started a new job? Or is work a bit tough? You might benefit from a mentor

By Prof Nina Barnett, FRPharmS

Mentoring is an excellent way of providing guidance and support for pharmacists at any time in their career, from being new to the profession or thinking of changing sector to dealing with difficult work situations or reflecting on the avenues open to maintain an optimal work-life balance.

Mentoring is often defined as a relationship in which a more experienced or more knowledgeable person helps a less experienced or less knowledgeable person. The activities involved can be varied and the scope can be wide. For example, the term can refer to a relationship in which the mentor provides guidance on development in general or on specific topics. It can also overlap with coaching, career guidance, support by peers and tutoring.

The term “mentoring” is sometimes used to describe the relationship between a tutor and tutee. The terminology can be confusing in pharmacy because for preregistration trainees, the tutor could be considered as a “qualification mentor” due to the regulatory requirement for guidance through a programme of study leading to a professional qualification. In addition, some trainees have both tutors and mentors.
In fact, mentors do not have to be experts or teachers. For example, peer mentoring relationships focus on mentee self-directed outcomes and the mentor is not a tutor but rather uses a facilitative approach to help mentees achieve their goals. Indeed, a pharmacist who is newly registered can be an effective mentor for a preregistration trainee because they will have recent experience of the preregistration year and of the examination.

Mentoring means different things to different people. To ensure a successful mentoring relationship, it is important understand the purpose of each mentoring relationship, both in relation to what the mentee wants to achieve and what the mentor can offer.

Mentoring is an excellent way of providing guidance and support for pharmacists at any time in their career, from being new to the profession or thinking of changing sector to dealing with difficult work situations or reflecting on the avenues open to maintain an optimal work-life balance.
Mentoring is often defined as a relationship in which a more experienced or more knowledgeable person helps a less experienced or less knowledgeable person. The activities involved can be varied and the scope can be wide. For example, the term can refer to a relationship in which the mentor provides guidance on development in general or on specific topics. It can also overlap with coaching, career guidance, support by peers and tutoring.

The term “mentoring” is sometimes used to describe the relationship between a tutor and tutee. The terminology can be confusing in pharmacy because for preregistration trainees, the tutor could be considered as a “qualification mentor” due to the regulatory requirement for guidance through a programme of study leading to a professional qualification. In addition, some trainees have both tutors and mentors.
In fact, mentors do not have to be experts or teachers. For example, peer mentoring relationships focus on mentee self-directed outcomes and the mentor is not a tutor but rather uses a facilitative approach to help mentees achieve their goals. Indeed, a pharmacist who is newly registered can be an effective mentor for a preregistration trainee because they will have recent experience of the preregistration year and of the examination.

Mentoring means different things to different people. To ensure a successful mentoring relationship, it is important understand the purpose of each mentoring relationship, both in relation to what the mentee wants to achieve and what the mentor can offer.

Benefits to mentees
Being mentored allows the mentee to improve their understanding of work issues and to be exposed to different approaches to dealing with them. The mentor can be used as a sounding board for ideas and, because the relationship and conversations are confidential, the mentee can speak freely without fear of repercussions.
Information can be disclosed privately to a mentor who, coming from a similar environment, will be able to understand and empathise. Alternatively, the mentee might choose to be mentored by someone in a different sector in order to expand their horizons.

One specialist pharmacist in mental health was mentored as a junior pharmacist and, said: “Mentoring provided me with support and practical advice on how to deal with challenging situations, and gave me an insight on how to develop my career path and make use of my strengths and weaknesses.”

Most people who have been mentored describe an increase in confidence as one of the key benefits. One pharmacist, prescriber in a senior hospital-based clinical role benefited from mentoring when they became a pharmacist prescriber, explained:

Although I was very confident and experienced as a pharmacist practitioner, I was new to pharmacist prescribing. I wanted a mentor for support and to guide me through training and in my role as a new prescriber… Through mentoring I was able to address the challenges of a new prescriber, which included defining my scope of practice in order to maximise patient contribution and ensuring my prescribing was safe and effective.”

As well as offering opportunities for self-learning, mentoring can also help mentees focus on their priorities. One pharmacist, with an existing career in across a range of pharmacy sectors contacted the RPS to find support with the career direction change. They said: “Over the years, I have found that those that are thriving (whether in professional or general life) have often been blessed with having had one or more mentors. I know I would not be where I am now if it were not for several folk who have actively invested in me over the years.”

Rewards for mentors
Mentors often express satisfaction in helping others to achieve their goals as well as enjoying the opportunity to give back to the profession. As a mentor, the satisfaction of seeing your mentee overcome difficulties and create the future they aspire to is extremely rewarding.
I have been fortunate throughout my career to be mentored, both formally and informally, by people who inspired me to achieve my potential and who supported me through the various challenges along the way. I am pleased to be able to mentor others in the hope that they will gain from it as much as I did.
In developing others, mentors also grow their own skills and may gain a different perspective on work. They also find that their confidence around addressing issues and in dealing with people from different backgrounds increases. Mentors do not necessarily need specific knowledge in the mentee’s area of practice (they might simply be required to ask questions to aid reflection and help the individual to self-solve problems) but some skills, such as the ability to question, listen and provide constructive feedback, are essential.

For both mentors and mentees, mentoring presents many opportunities for continuing professional development. The relationship promotes learning, commitment and motivation, all of which support completion of revalidation entries. Entries may include learning that results from meetings and discussions, providing and receiving support or feedback, and evaluating progress either as a mentor or mentee. Mentoring experiences can be used to identify or refine learning focus.

Support
Many professional organisations recognise the benefit of mentoring services and provide this service for their members. Most health-related royal colleges, such as nursing, psychiatry and obstetrics and gynaecology, offer mentorship to their respective students and trainees.
RPS has a mentoring platform which facilitates easy and appropriate matching of mentor to mentee. You need to decide what you would like a mentor to support you with. You can then select and approach a mentor based on their profile of skills and experience. Join the RPS platform today and find your perfect match.

Sign up www.rpharms.com/mentoring

How to ensure effective mentoring

Stephen Goundrey-Smith explains how pharmacists can benefit from mentoring and gives his recommendations for ensuring mentees and mentors get the most out of a mentoring relationship

Mentoring is a useful tool for those interested in career progression or simply anyone wanting support. 

Mentoring is a one-to-one relationship of professional development, usually between someone seeking professional progression and a more experienced practitioner. This could also include someone seeking to develop new expertise and a practitioner already active in that area.

Mentoring is different from coaching in that mentoring is concerned with professional development, rather than learning specific skills but many commentators argue that there is considerable crossover between the two.

Mentoring has been shown to have a positive impact on career development in healthcare, helping to improve confidence and interpersonal skills of mentors as well as mentees. It also improves career retention rates and work performance. Moreover, work among psychiatrists showed that mentoring greatly benefited professionals who worked in multidisciplinary teams or who were isolated from their peers in daily practice. Read the full article here

Find out more about RPS Mentoring and how it can help you.

My aspirations for the NHS Community Pharmacist Consultation Service

As the new Community Pharmacist Consultation Service goes live, English Pharmacy Board member Andre Yeung, a key developer of the earlier Digital Minor Illness Referral Service, offers his thoughts on how to make it a success.

How did the Community Pharmacist Consultation Service develop?

My good friend and colleague Mike Maguire and I actually started talking about this right back in the summer of 2014. Back then NHS 111 wasn’t really referring to community pharmacy – they mainly sent patients to GP services, walk-in centres or A&E departments. It got us thinking that community pharmacy could do so much more in this space if we only just connected the network up with NHS 111.

After our NHS Pharmacy Integration-funded pilot in December 2017 we’re now presented with a national roll-out this October. It’s taken some time to get to this point, and it took a little bit of convincing about pharmacists’ role, but I believe the future delivery of this service is really important for community pharmacy and the NHS. We’ve had over 28,000 patients referred into community pharmacies as part of our pilot and community pharmacists have done an absolutely astounding job of clinically assessing, advising, treating, managing and escalating patients within an integrated primary care system. 100% – we’re now the first port of call for minor illnesses here in the North East.

Why do you think the CPCS is so important?

My belief is that Community pharmacy developing a role in acute out of hospital care is more important than the sum of all other commission services that have been commissioned through community pharmacy.

Why? Firstly, because acute care is needed and appreciated by patients! Secondly, it doesn’t just disappear if pharmacy doesn’t do it so it’s needed by the NHS too. Thirdly, the size and scale of this is massive.  It seems to me a ‘no brainer’ that if pharmacy helps out our GP and nurse colleagues they too would start to argue that the right place for managing patients with minor illnesses is within community pharmacy. Pharmacy can provide patients with excellent access to services and because of our scale can take pressure off NHS colleagues as we head into the busy winter season.

What are the considerations that are needed to enable around a national roll-out?

It’s a big task to get the best out of this service. In some respects, this is business as usual for pharmacists, in others it’s completely different. I don’t think there’s been a more challenging service launch in the history of community pharmacy.  As of October 29th we’ll be connected to the NHS in a way that we haven’t been in the past. People will be monitoring and counting on our clinical interventions so we need to ensure the quality of what we deliver is of a really high standard across the board. If we can do that, and I believe we can, then this could be a seminal moment for our profession – a really positive turning point that leads to further developmental opportunities in the clinical arena. How great would it be to achieve amazing results with the spotlight on us like never before?

What message would you give to front-line pharmacists?

These are a few of my top things to remember about CPCS:

  • CPCS about YOUR clinical assessment in the pharmacy. Get the info you need and make your own professional clinical judgement as NHS 111 have only done a triage based on what the patient has reported on the phone. A great clinical assessment keeps the patient safe, is rewarding for the pharmacist and importantly helps patients get well as they have the right plan in place.
  • Three most likely outcomes of your assessment will be a) you can help the patient, b) you need to escalate the patient or c) you can’t help the patient but you don’t need to escalate.
  • Safety net every patient: advice on when to act and how to act if things don’t improve or get worse.
  • Keep decent clinical notes in the IT system, for patient benefit and yours.
  • When you escalate in hours, most times you’ll need to speak to the GP not the receptionist. You’ll be escalating because you have a clinical concern so it’s only natural you’ll want to communicate this to the receiving GP – it’s both helpful and courteous to do so! Out of hours you’ll be going back to NHS 111 via the healthcare professional line so be prepared to request a referral or support from the clinical assessment service.
  • Reflect on your practice. If you need some additional training then sort this out as part of your CPD.

What are my aspirations for the future of the service?

Initially, this is about community pharmacy the sector maximising this opportunity. It’s about us ‘knocking this out of the ballpark’ so to speak. That’s my main aspiration!

If we achieve this then the NHS have already outlined an opportunity to work with GP referrals into community pharmacy for minor illnesses.

In the future, what would be good would be some additional training, access to some POMs and some basic equipment (oximeters, BP monitors, thermometers etc.).  This will allow us to see other types of patients as our functionality increases. Why not see patients with suspected UTIs, with impetigo etc? I know my colleagues at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society will be pleased to hear me say that I think the roll out of Pharmacist Prescribers will eventually come on the back of all of this work. We’ll need them as we do more and more in this domain.

It’s all very exciting! Caveat to all of the above? We MUST deliver this first phase of the service well.  Organisations need to support our front line pharmacists and pharmacy teams to deliver quality. They absolutely have the capability to do it, they’re amazing, but they will need our help and support to make it happen!

Our Mental Health and Wellbeing Campaign

By Jonathan Burton MBE FRPharmS, Chair of the Scottish Pharmacy Board

I think we can all agree that being a pharmacist can often be stressful and demanding. My personal experience of managing my wellbeing, in the context of my work as a community pharmacist, has been a journey.

Early in my career (I’m 20 years qualified now) I often struggled to control stress & anxiety when workload was high in the pharmacy, I could be irritable and looking back I’m sure this was noticed by and affected my work colleagues and patients alike. I co-own the company I work for and this had the added effect of causing me to feel a lot of guilt, even in situations in the pharmacy that I couldn’t really exert any control over, as I inherently felt it was always in part my fault if my team and I were struggling. I seemed to carry this with me all the time. 

Further on in my career now I feel I manage these emotions better, but I still notice the negative impact that busy and stressful days and experiences have on my life & general wellbeing. I can control it at work better, but at home sometimes it’s still a struggle. If you ask my wife and children they’ll tell you, I often find it difficult to switch off from work and it sometimes takes me some time after arriving home before I feel I’m the husband to my wife and father to my boys I think I should be. If it’s a tough week at work I often stop looking after myself, my diet worsens and exercise stops. 

I consider myself lucky, I enjoy my job and have always felt fortunate to be a part of a profession that cares for others. But as health professionals we need to look after ourselves and each other as well as the public and patients we care for. We are human, and we will have our struggles with our wellbeing and mental health, but this does not mean we don’t deserve help to manage these challenges. 

If you are a pharmacist reading this, and haven’t done so already, please help the RPS and Pharmacist Support fight for better access for pharmacists to help with their wellbeing and mental health issues by completing our survey. It really will make a difference, thank you.

My first week as an RPS intern

Simi Aguda, Second year pharmacy student

I’m Simi Aguda, a second year Pharmacy student at the University of Portsmouth. I recently had the opportunity to work within the Royal Pharmaceutical Society in Education and Professional Development.

My first week began with an introduction to the different teams at the RPS by Aamir Shaikh, a Professional Development Pharmacist who supports early career pharmacists.

I met with the different departments and organisations within the Royal Pharmaceutical Society, including the BNF, Pharmaceutical Journal, Education, Team England, Events, Marketing and Professional Support. I was immediately welcomed and was excited to see what the professional body of Pharmacists got up to ‘behind the scenes.’

My first project was to review the RPS website from a student perspective, suggest improvements and present my findings to the Marketing Team. I needed to be analytical and precise and further develop my presentation skills, as well as evaluate whether the content of the website matched the needs of Pharmacy students like myself. After the presentation the changes were made to the website and my feedback was taken on board. I noticed how the RPS valued giving and receiving feedback, and that as a student my opinion and thoughts mattered. This has been an integral part of my experience and demystified my preconceptions of the RPS and their culture.

My second project was analysing data collected from Pharmacy students and Pre-Registration trainees and identifying changes and patterns from the data set and how this could improve RPS membership. In addition, I had the opportunity to work with Gareth Kitson, Professional Engagement Lead, whose role is to promote pharmacy across England, as well as liaise with the media and Government to champion and speak up for Pharmacy. This broadened my perception of potential pharmacy careers.

Next, I had the opportunity to meet with the head of Marketing, Neal Patel. I was invited to discuss how the RPS can engage with students like myself, this was an incredibly informative meeting and provided me with insight into how dedicated the RPS is to helping Students, Pre-Registration trainees and qualified pharmacists. The focus was always on how the RPS can support its members. As a student I was unaware of the resources available for me. I have since met other interns who were placed within the Pharmaceutical Journal, and we have worked together to create content for the RPS digital channels.

RPS at Conservative Party Conference

By Sibby Buckle FRPharmS, Chair, Pharmacy Digital Forum and English Board member

Sibby Buckle and John Lunny with the Secretary of State for Health, Matt Hancock

A rainy Manchester was the setting for this year’s Conservative Party Conference. The slogan “Get Brexit Done” emblazoned across the outside of the convention complex to greet the mix of party members, campaigners and lobbyists. It was a recurring message throughout the proceedings, with the party of government looking to focus on issues other than Europe, but Brexit still dominated much of the speeches and debates.

With a new Prime Minister, a reshuffled Cabinet, and continued speculation over a potential general election, the backdrop for this conference was far from usual. Indeed, after a Supreme court ruling, Parliament itself was still sitting while the conference was going on. Would opposition parties try to table votes so that Conservative MPs would have to travel back to London? Would there be a vote of no confidence in the Government? Would the Conference need to finish early? As it was, none of this came to pass and the party managed to set out its agenda largely unimpeded.

The policy announcement on health which received the most attention in the news was for the extra £13.4Bn funding for hospital infrastructure, but there were lots of other events and debates in the conference fringes as well.

I was delighted to join representatives from a number of Royal Colleges at a roundtable on workforce, hosted by the Royal College of Physicians and the British Medical Association, as well as Health Committee member Andrew Selous MP and Marcus Fysh MP. The discussion focused on how to make the NHS the best place to work and how we can support recruitment – a key theme of the Interim NHS People Plan. This is a big focus for the RPS, looking at a range of issues such as education and training, recruitment into new roles such as in primary care networks, and how pharmacists’ mental health can be supported in an often-pressurised work environment.

I also raised the need for funding for Community Pharmacists to train as Independent Prescribers (IP’s) to help ease the pressure on GP’s, and encourage the public to visit their ‘Pharmacy First’. This is becoming more pressing as the move to give prescribing rights to Physicians Associates, Anaesthetists Associates, and Clinical Scientists increases. I don’t want our Pharmacy profession left behind!

Fringe Events

At an NHS Confederation fringe on “The NHS in a post-Brexit world” with Vicky Ford MP, a member of the Science and Technology Committee, I highlighted how pharmacists are key to helping patients access their medicines, particularly in the event of potential shortages. Indeed, we have already had the first ‘Serious Shortage Protocol’ (SSP) announced.

I then hot-footed it to a roundtable with Turning Point on health inequalities and the Government’s prevention green paper, using this opportunity to flag the need for an agreed mechanism for Pharmacists to be enabled to, and fully engage in, ‘social prescribing’.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock MP spoke really positively about pharmacy later that day “in conversation” with the Centre for Policy Studies. When asked about the new announcement on hospital funding, he went on to highlight the importance of supporting prevention and how pharmacists can play a vital role in helping people stay healthy and out of hospital, as well as treating minor ailments in the community and taking pressure off GPs. He welcomed the direction of travel set out in the new community pharmacy contract so that pharmacists can provide more services and said he hoped this would be further expanded in future to make even greater use of pharmacists’ clinical skills.

It was great to hear the message getting through about how pharmacists will be really important to helping deliver the NHS Long-Term Plan. With the “final” NHS People Plan expected in the coming months, we’ll keep talking to Government and the NHS about supporting the profession to get the best results for our patients.

Yes, a conference focused on Brexit, but with Health still firmly on the agenda.

Your introduction to drug safety

By Professor Saad Shakir, Director at Drug Safety Research Unit

We are delighted to be joining forces with the Royal Pharmaceutical Society to provide this course to introduce pharmacovigilance to pharmacists. Pharmacovigilance is defined by the European Medicines Agency as “the science and activities relating to the detection, assessment, understanding and prevention of adverse effects or any other medicine-related problem.”

Monitoring safety and pharmacovigilance are key activities during the lifecycle of a medicine, both at the pre-marketing stage and once it is licensed for use in humans. No medicine is without risk of adverse effects and the science of drug safety involves assessing and optimising the risk-benefit balance for each medicine.

This course will detail the key role that pharmacists have to play in pharmacovigilance and will explain why it is important to report adverse drug reactions and methods for doing so. Presentations will be complemented by interactive sessions.

Routine risk minimisation measures are required for each drug and include the SmPC, PIL, packet size and the legal state. For products where these are considered insufficient, additional risk minimisation measures will be required in order to optimise the risk/benefit balance and maintain patient safety in everyday use of the drug. Community pharmacists are frequently involved in additional risk minimisation measures usually at the point at which a medicine is dispensed. For example, pharmacists may be asked to keep a log to indicate whether they have provided a patient card to the patient with their medicine (in addition to the PIL) and explained its use. The patient card may list serious potential side effects and actions to be taken in the event of occurrence.

This blog aims to provide you with a glimpse of the course. We do hope that you will be able to join us!

Book your place now

https://events.rpharms.com/website/672/home/

Thinking of a career in drug safety?

By Dania Shamil MPharmS, MSc, PV Manager of International Pharmacovigilance and UK QPPV at Vertex Pharmaceuticals

Having worked in various sectors of pharmacy including hospital, community and academia I found my passion in drug safety and the pharmaceutical industry. I wanted to improve my technical knowledge in drug safety, therefore I completed an MSc in Pharmacovigilance (PV) soon after my MPharm degree at the Drug Safety Research Unit (DSRU). I recognised that I had a great career ahead and my enthusiasm grew knowing that I could ensure patient safety by monitoring the adverse effects of marketed or investigational drugs. It is a great career for a pharmacist as you are still able to use the scientific knowledge gained in a MPharm degree, as well as develop new skills.  drug safety it is a very important role in the drug lifecycle! With the increasing changes in drug safety regulations globally, I am continuously developing my technical PV knowledge as well as my analytical skills, which is the central theme in a PV career. No two days are the same! 

I am the founder and leader of the ‘Thinking of a career in drug safety course’. It is a new and exciting course for anyone interested in a career in drug safety. Previous experience is not required. The course helps pharmacists understand the opportunities that the pharmaceutical industry presents.

The course is taught by leading experts who have extensive experience in drug safety and who will share their insights and provide advice for the array of career options. The course will introduce the importance of drug safety, how this affects patients and what it is like to work in a patient safety department. Practical workshops will give delegates an understanding of the ongoing and proactive drug safety activities which are taking place in the patient safety departments and the key partnerships with health authorities to ensure that the patients are safe whilst they are taking medicines.

Dania Shamil MPharmS, MSc, PV Manager of International Pharmacovigilance and UK QPPV at Vertex Pharmaceuticals.