Diabetes care – get involved!

by Professor Mahendra G. Patel, Diabetes Lead, English Pharmacy Board

Today we’ve published our new policy ‘Using pharmacists to help improve care for people with Type 2 Diabetes’. Aimed at policy makers and service commissioners within the NHS in England, it calls for pharmacists in various care settings to be fully integrated into services for those with Type 2 diabetes. This makes way for increased prevention, earlier detection, and better access to diabetes care tailored to individual needs.  

More than five million people in the UK are expected to have Type 2 diabetes by 2025. This is a national challenge in terms of poor health outcomes, economic burden to the NHS, and ever-widening health inequalities largely driven by factors such as ethnicity and deprivation. Each year within hospitals, there are thousands of patients with diabetes experiencing medication errors that could be avoided.

Significant numbers of people are failing to meet the nationally recommended treatment targets in reducing risk of complications associated with type 2 diabetes. Many are not understanding their condition nor adhering to prescribed treatment. In my opinion, this is a critical time to make more effective use of the extensive clinical skills of the pharmacist.

The NHS Long Term Plan recognises the vital role of pharmacists and their clinical skills in supporting patients to achieve better health outcomes, improving patient safety and reducing medication errors. The recent establishment of new Primary Care Networks and the growing maturity of local Integrated Care Systems, together provide unparalleled opportunities for people to receive better access to their pharmacists, more personalised support, and joined-up care at the right time in the optimal care setting.

In line with new and emerging roles for pharmacists and advancing practice, and at a time when technology is set to command a pivotal role in healthcare, our new policy on diabetes builds on our previous national campaigns.

It translates the latest evidence into practice, focusing on helping people to live longer and lead healthier lives whilst ensuring effective and safe use of medicines. It further highlights the need to support services within and across different care settings, where pharmacists can make significant and meaningful differences in improving health outcomes.

It also shows how pharmacists, who are integrated within a specialist diabetes multidisciplinary team, can provide added value and synergy across care pathways as routine daily practice.

Professor Sir David Haslam, Chair of NICE, one of the many organisations supporting our policy states, ‘Diabetes is a public health emergency’. We will continue to press these recommendations to progress this crucial national work.

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