Social media – let’s make it a force for good.

Social media use is always under scrutiny.

Whether it’s the amount of screen time children should have or whether vloggers should be encouraging gambling, the public’s mood seems to be in favour of more regulation, accountability and transparency.

We are fast approaching RPS elections time! We want everyone to enjoy the experience of being part of the elections, whether as a candidate or as voter, so we will do our best to encourage friendly and professional discussion.

Over the next few weeks we’ll be ‘re-releasing’ our social media guidance in bite size chunks. We’ll be encouraging members standing for election to campaign via social media, online forums and blogs. We know this is a great way to reach and engage with voters. If you’re standing for election this year, we will send you specific guidance to help.

The best advice I’ve ever received about testing whether something is suitable to be shared on social media or not is: “If you wouldn’t say it in the ‘real world’, don’t say it in the ‘digital world’.

We love a robust but polite debate. Read more Social media – let’s make it a force for good.

I am what I am! LGBT History Month

By Mike Beaman, FRPharmS, retired pharmacist

I am writing this blog in support of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society’s response to LGBT History Month.  Although not a gay activist I have, nevertheless, been generally open about my lifestyle since coming to terms with being a gay man back in the early 1970s.

I was born in 1947 so I was 19 and a university undergraduate when the legislation decriminalising homosexuality became law in 1967. I was already a young adult and therefore having an intimate relationship with another man before that time would have been a criminal act and would also have resulted in my being sent down from university and unable to eventually register as a pharmacist. Read more I am what I am! LGBT History Month

Veterinary medicines – Use them or lose them?

By Rob Morris, FRPhamS, Chair of the RPS Veterinary Pharmacy Forum

In case you didn’t know, pharmacists are in a very privileged position when it comes to the supply of veterinary medicines in the UK. Unlike human medicines, the animal equivalents are regulated and licensed by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) – an executive agency sponsored by DEFRA.

Whilst the vast majority of vet medicines are handled by veterinary surgeons, animal health merchants and pet stores, the VMD still regards pharmacists a key supplier to both the farm and pet-owning public. Animal health merchant and pet store owners must ensure they have appropriately trained staff, or Suitably Qualified Persons (SQPs) and also operate from licensed premises which the VMD duly inspect and regulate – rather like our GPhC. The VMD are satisfied that pharmacists already have the appropriate professional knowledge, training and regulation so they do not interfere. Read more Veterinary medicines – Use them or lose them?

Biosimilar adalimumab is a test of shared decision making in the NHS

Co-written by the National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society, National Ankylosing Spondylitis Society, RNIB, Birdshot Uveitis Society, Psoriasis Association and Crohn’s & Colitis UK

The entry of new biosimilars and the creation of an NHS ‘local market of treatment options’ will see significant numbers of patients switched from the originator product, Humira, to one of four biosimilar alternatives this year.

Adalimumab is one of several biological drugs used in the treatment of autoimmune inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, non-infectious posterior uveitis, Crohn’s and colitis.

While some patients will take this in their stride, for others the change will be met with feelings of apprehension. Read more Biosimilar adalimumab is a test of shared decision making in the NHS

Polypharmacy – what is it and why is it important?

By Clare Howard, FFRPS FRPharmS, lead author of the RPS guidance Polypharmacy: getting our medicines right

What is polypharmacy?
We know that medicines have an enormous, positive impact on the lives of millions of people. But as more of us live longer, with multiple long-term conditions, we take more and more medicines. Taking many different medicines at once can become either a practical challenge or increase the likelihood of harm, or both.

Problems with polypharmacy happen when: 
• Medicines are prescribed that are no longer clinically indicated, appropriate or optimised for that person
• The harm of a particular medicine outweighs the benefit
• The combination of medicines being taken has the potential to, or is actually causing harm to the person
• Where the practicalities of using the medicines have become unmanageable or are causing harm or distress.  Read more Polypharmacy – what is it and why is it important?

Primary care networks: getting started

by Stephanie West, RPS Regional Liaison Pharmacist

One of the things that excites me as a Regional Liaison Pharmacist for RPS is seeing examples of how local primary care professionals are coming together to discuss good patient care, provided by the right practitioner, close to home. So it was fantastic to see clear recognition of the key roles pharmacists play  Read more Primary care networks: getting started

A brief history of fake medicines: ancient Greeks and ‘trashy elixirs’

By Matthew Johnston, RPS Museum

On 9 February the Falsified Medicines Directive will come into force, making it harder for fake prescription medicines to reach patients. Although this is the latest piece of legislation to tackle counterfeit medicines, the problem is far from a new one.

For as long as branded medicines have been around, authenticity has been important. As early as 500 BC, priestesses on the Greek island of Lemnos supplied tablets of medicinal clay, stamped with a special seal while still wet, in order to guarantee they were the genuine article. Read more A brief history of fake medicines: ancient Greeks and ‘trashy elixirs’

Supporting and managing diabetes among the South Asian diaspora

How the pharmacy profession can play a huge role in providing effective support and care

Diabetes and the population

Type 2 diabetes is a preventable long-term condition which is currently highly prevalent and steadily increasing.

Research has shown that some ethnicities are at higher risk for developing the condition. South Asian people make up the second largest ethnic group in the UK, after the white population, and are at an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes in comparison. With the condition being up to six times more common in this ethnic group, it is a growing problem in the community.

“It is important that culturally appropriate advice is provided to those of South Asian origin”

The average age of onset in this group is 25, as opposed to 40 in the White population. There are a number of health complications related to diabetes, which include cardiovascular risk and mental health. It is therefore important that culturally appropriate advice is provided to those of South Asian origin, including advice about fasting, diet and exercise.

Read more Supporting and managing diabetes among the South Asian diaspora

Biosimilars: a great opportunity for pharmacists in England

by Jonathan Campbell, RPS Regional Liaison Pharmacist

Biosimilars have huge benefits for patients and the NHS and offer opportunities for pharmacists too.

The NHS Long Term Plan sets out how “the NHS will move to a new service model in which patients get more options, better support, and properly joined-up care at the right time in the optimal care setting”.

These new models of integrated care will need organisations and their staff to work together across the traditional boundaries of community, general practice and hospital – adopting a system leadership approach to improving population health that puts the patient at its heart. Read more Biosimilars: a great opportunity for pharmacists in England

Making a difference to mental health patients

By Caroline Dada, Lead Pharmacist for Community Services, Gender Identity & Medication Safety Officer

Mental health treatment has been transformed in the last 20 years leading to a significant reduction in the number of inpatient beds. The treatment of mental health is unrecognisable from the asylums of old, thank goodness!

This transformation has led to a major shift in care provision, with many patients with mental health problems being seen by the GP with limited specialist input. GPs have raised concerns about this change, reporting a need for increased knowledge and competence and improved co-operation between primary and secondary care. Patients are also concerned, with 22% reporting they needed more specialist input1. Read more Making a difference to mental health patients