Get all the support you need for your time at university

By Laura Bushell, Marketing and Communications Coordinator

We offer our student members an extensive range of resources to facilitate your learning and to help you to achieve your best in your studies. Because we offer so many resources, we understand that it can be difficult to know where to start!

That’s why we’ve created a ‘Student Hub’ dedicated to the resources that will be essential in your studies.

Read more Get all the support you need for your time at university

Creating a profession where you feel comfortable to be yourselves

by Robbie Turner, RPS Director for England

Recently I wrote a blog about  LGBTQ Pride celebrations describing how upset I was that LGBTQ young people were still suffering high levels of abuse, discrimination and mental health issues as a result of their identity. I promised to reflect on what more the RPS could do to support pharmacists to help young LGBTQ people and we are exploring how our future RPS campaigns can deliver this. Read more Creating a profession where you feel comfortable to be yourselves

What do pharmacists need to know about heartburn?

By Dr Pulak Sahay, Consultant Gastroenterologist and Senior Lecturer of Medicine, Leeds University

What is reflux?

It is estimated that there are over 10 million adults in the UK who suffer from heartburn (sometimes known as reflux disease or Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux Disease (GORD)).  If left untreated or poorly controlled, this can cause considerable discomfort and lead to a poor quality of life. In extreme situations, untreated heartburn can cause a host of both gastrointestinal (GI) and non-GI complications, including severe complications such as Oesophageal Adenocarcinoma (OA) – known as Oesophageal Cancer. Read more What do pharmacists need to know about heartburn?

Pharmacy’s future is digital

By Sibby Buckle, Chair of the RPS Digital Forum

 

What is the RPS Pharmacy Digital Forum?

It’s where the profession comes together to forge the future.  We are an enthusiastic and committed group of 30+ members who agree that digital literacy across the profession needs urgent attention.

With representation from across the UK, and from all sectors of pharmacy – community, primary care and hospital, PMR suppliers, NHS Digital, DH, PSNC, PRSB, and NHS Improvement –  there is a real appetite to create the change needed to enable pharmacy to be truly integrated into the NHS and healthcare. Read more Pharmacy’s future is digital

Strengthening Pharmacy in Scotland

Rose Marie ParrArticle by Rose Marie Parr, Chief Pharmaceutical Officer, Scottish Government

On 21 August 2017, I launched the new pharmacy strategy for Scotland: Achieving Excellence in Pharmaceutical Care which sets out the priorities, commitments and actions for improving and integrating pharmacy services in Scotland.

During the launch I had the pleasure of visiting both a community pharmacy and a GP practice in Port Glasgow to meet health and social care practitioners to talk about the way pharmacy services are adapting and enhancing care in the NHS. Read more Strengthening Pharmacy in Scotland

My week at RPS

Roshnee Patel, MPharms Student at King’s College London

What’s happening behind the scenes? As a pharmacy student it is very difficult to understand and know what is being done for us outside the four walls of our university. My week at RPS demonstrated to me how much support there is available after we graduate but also during our studies. Fortunately, I was able to spend some time within the marketing team and I got to see it all.

From just about knowing how to use Google calendar to now being able to structure, format and schedule social media posts, my time at RPS has enabled me to develop a wide range of my skill sets. In the RPS, opportunities are always knocking on your door. I was given the opportunity to write an email to students in Birmingham. Having had no previous experience in writing emails to such a large number of recipients, I was taught the do’s and don’ts and how to template my email. Within the marketing team, I also got to witness the amount of hard work which goes into planning and preparing for anything to be sent out to the public and making sure that whatever is being sent out is for the correct audience with the most useful information. Before anything is sent to the public it is prepared and checked way in advance. The FIP World Congress next year is being held in Glasgow and is being hosted by the RPS. Even though the event is over a year away, a tremendous amount of work is currently being done to make sure the event is the best. Having also got the chance to sit in on a meeting, I saw how the RPS have and are still developing programmes to help pharmacy students from their first day till their last and beyond that as well. When we’ve just finished our pre-reg year or we’re over 10 years into our career it is comforting to know that the RPS will be there to support and guide us if we need them. It was also great to see how the RPS are always highlighting the importance of pharmacists in the community and are continuously changing themselves to make our journeys easier.

Read more My week at RPS

Write a winning abstract for conferences

Poster display

Write a winning abstract and submit for our inaugural Winter Summit.

Want to hear about the latest innovations in medicines and pharmacy? Looking to get your M.Pharm project published in an international journal? Interested in a career in academia or pharmaceutical science?

Explore the latest innovations in pharmaceutical science and research and get your work published. Join us for the RPS Winter Summit!

 

A new event in the RPS calendar, the Winter Summit will bring together experts from within pharmacy and pharmaceutical science for a programme of cutting edge topics: big data, drug development and the future of education to name a few.

Submit an abstract

Abstract submissions for oral or poster presentation are welcomed from across the science and research spectrum, so whether you have been working in the lab or on a patient-facing project, we have an opportunity for you.

  • Pharmaceutical science and early stage clinical research will be published in the Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology (Impact Factor 2.405)
  • Health service research and pharmacy practice will be published in the International Journal of Pharmacy Practice

For more information about the submissions process and guidance visit the webpage here

Get help from the RPS in writing your abstract

  • So what is an abstract? An abstract is a concise summary of a project that allows readers to quickly identify its novelty, rigour and potential impact. Writing an abstract is an opportunity to share evidence widely and is a key component of most professional conferences; it is also an excellent starting point for those new to research looking to get their work recognised.
  • Writing winning abstracts. An abstract should be a summary of a project with a clear aim and concise design, method and results with meaningful conclusion.

Join us on September 7th for an instructional webinar to help prepare your abstract. The webinar will review abstract structure and give helpful tips on judging criteria and common pitfalls

Submit your abstract by 5pm GMT on 11 September or book now to secure your place at the Winter Summit 2017.

Embrace technology in order to release time for pharmaceutical care

Article by Norman Lannigan Lead for Evaluation of Automated Technology (EAT) 

The Wilson and Barber review of pharmaceutical care in the community advised that the potential of automated dispensing systems, including robotics, should be evaluated for its potential to release time for more pharmaceutical care. This led to the establishment by the Scottish Government of the Evaluation of Automated Technology (EAT) work stream under the Prescription for Excellence programme, which I was asked to lead. Read more Embrace technology in order to release time for pharmaceutical care

Pre-Registration Exam: Whatever the result, the RPS is here for you

Today, the GPhC released the results of the June 2017 registration assessment. It’s a fantastic time of year where the next batch of pharmacists are beginning their fulfilling career in such a challenging but rewarding industry.

The GPhC Chief Executive, Duncan Rudkin said, “I want to congratulate the trainees who passed this year’s registration assessment and wish them all the best for their future careers. From the first day on our register, pharmacists play an integral role in supporting the health of their patients. The registration assessment helps to make sure that candidates have – and are able to demonstrate – the knowledge and skills to meet this important responsibility.”

Unfortunately, we know that the exams are extremely tough and that not everyone will be celebrating today. This year, 78.2% of trainees passed the exam, which means just over 600 pre-registration trainees having unfortunately, fallen short.

Whatever the result means for you, we want you to know that the RPS is here to support you. We have a number of resources on our website, ranging from essential guides for starting your career, right through to alternative options if you have failed the exam for the third and final time.

If you didn’t pass the pre-registration assessment then don’t panic. The RPS professional support service can be contacted on support@rpharms.com or by phone on 0845 257 2570. Our friendly and knowledgeable team can offer guidance on any issues or questions you might have, and let you know what steps to take.

If you passed then follow these useful links

Essential guides for community
Essential guide for hospital
Essential guide for pharmaceutical industry
Foundation Programme
Mentoring

If you haven’t passed, these links and resources will help you prepare for the next assessment

The latest MEP
The reclassification hub
A-Z resources, which includes a range of Quick Reference Guides
Top tips for preparing for the assessment

If you failed for the third and final time, although you may not be able to register as a pharmacist, you have gained a valuable set of knowledge, skills and experience through your degree and pre-registration training. Many of these are transferrable to other roles and environments. There are many alternative opportunities available to you so do not give up on your career aspirations.

Pharmacist Support outlines some career options in their factsheet, Careers advice and options for pharmacy graduates. This covers pharmacy and non-pharmacy roles that you can consider. Think about all the options available to you and research potential roles to see if they interest you.

Once you have decided on a new career path to pursue, try to arrange work placements in this sector/environment to give you an idea of what the role may be like, and what the day-to-day responsibilities and tasks are.

Tips

  • Consider registering with recruitment agencies
  • Make use of social media such as LinkedIn and Twitter to network and make contacts
  • Highlight the skills and knowledge you have gained to enhance your CV and cover letter when applying for jobs
  • Seek advice from a careers centre or advisor

For more details and the full pass list please visit the GPhC website.

Revalidation for pharmacy professionals

By Nigel Clarke, Chair, General Pharmaceutical Council

Over the past three years, the General Pharmaceutical Council has done a great deal of work on professionalism – how to ensure that the standards we set support professionalism; and, as important, how to assure patients and the public that registrants are upholding these standards and keeping up with their knowledge and skills, and with new developments in the professions.

This work has coincided with a period of change in the pharmacy sector – changes in the healthcare landscape, the role of pharmacy and the expectations placed on pharmacy professionals; and changes in the core knowledge and skills required to deliver safe, effective, person-centred care.

As a part of this effort, we have engaged with members of the profession, with patients, and with other healthcare professionals to hear their views on professionalism, and, in particular, how they can be assured that pharmacy professionals have up-to-date knowledge and up-to-date understanding of issues affecting healthcare, pharmacy and the way care is delivered.    Based on their feedback, and underpinned by the findings in the pilot programme we undertook last year to test our approach, we have proposed to introduce revalidation for pharmacy professionals.   That proposal is the subject of our recent consultation on revalidation.

.    Our approach aims to do away with exhaustive record keeping and ‘tick-box’ exercises – which many registrants felt were no longer fit for purpose, and the public find hard to equate with professional development – and introduce a more thoughtful approach to ensuring that professional development is not just documented, but embedded in practice.    Our proposal incorporates peer discussion, and reflection on the GPhC’s standards for pharmacy professionals and registrants’ individual practice to provide meaningful reassurance to the public that real learning and improvement are taking place.

Among the key changes we are proposing with revalidation are: reducing the number of required CPD records from nine to four; conducting a peer discussion with a colleague or someone who understands your work; and writing a reflective account detailing how you are meeting one or more of the standards for pharmacy professionals. We are also proposing that, rather than ‘calling’ records periodically for review, the GPhC would require them to be submitted annually; with a small sample (about 2.5 per cent) randomly selected for review.

This approach is designed to underpin the professional approach of pharmacists and pharmacy technicians, and reflects too the way in which other professions are now engaging in revalidation. It is based upon the view that a consistent pursuit of improvement in practice is the best way to ensure ongoing high standards within pharmacy, and with it greater safety for the public and patients. During our initial pilot, this approach has been widely supported by the professionals who took part.

I would encourage all pharmacy professionals to weigh in with their views on our proposal.  Have there been any points or considerations that we’ve missed?  Are there any changes that we need to make?  Are there emphases that we’ve not properly understood?

And while it is likely that the final plan will not come into effect until 2020, pharmacy professionals can and should begin to prepare themselves now for the inevitable changes that will come from this effort.

As a start, I would encourage all registrants to read the new standards for pharmacy professionals, which sit at the heart of the proposals for revalidation.   Understanding the standards and thinking how they can and should be embedded in practice will be an important best practice to embrace in preparation for revalidation when it comes into effect.

Registrants can also begin to talk about their practice with their colleagues and peers.  The idea of a ‘peer discussion’ may feel daunting at first, but many of our pilot volunteers realised they were already having these kinds of conversations, albeit informally, and that the candid insights and advice they received helped to improve their practice.    So, I would urge you to reach out to colleagues and peers, or perhaps tap into the resources available to pharmacy professionals, such as the RPS Faculty, and start these conversations.

Revalidation will be an important step for the pharmacy sector and for the GPhC as its regulator.   Aside from assuring the public that pharmacy professionals are maintaining high standards of practice and improvement, our revalidation proposal represents our commitment to regulating in a way that is flexible, that supports professionalism and that is fit for today’s pharmacy and healthcare environment.  I look forward to sharing some of the feedback we hear from our consultation when I speak at the RPS conference in September.   I hope to see you there.