The important thing to remember is: VOTE!

by Chris Bonsell, Locum Pharmacist and RPS West Yorkshire Steering Group Member

Benjamin Franklin once mused ‘Nothing can be certain, except death and taxes’. If he was alive today he might have included: …and nothing can be certain in the outcome of this year’s English Pharmacy Board elections! This year we see 14 nominations for only four substantive vacancies to the EPB.

Pharmacy has been going through great change for many years and the way we work is very different now from 10 years ago or even 5 years ago. Pharmacists are now more clinically focused, working in new and emerging roles and are leaders within systems and organisations which at one time would have seemed unthinkable. We play a more pivotal role in patient-centred care, educating the public and in the prevention of disease.

Members of the EPB have a responsibility to be effective in their representation of all pharmacists across all sectors and to be vanguards of the profession. They should be inspirational not only to those who elected them but also to pharmacists throughout the country still to join the Royal Pharmaceutical Society. Read more The important thing to remember is: VOTE!

Drugs according to Daniel Hanbury

By Karen Horn, RPS Librarian

In 1842, knowledge of the origin and identity of imported crude drugs was limited. Drug adulteration was a problem recognised by the Pharmaceutical Society, much as it still is today.

To build public trust in pharmacists the Society decided that would-be members should be able to identify crude drugs, detect adulteration and know a drug’s botanical and geographical sources.  This is how materia medica came to be included as a subject for study at the Society’s newly opened School of Pharmacy. Read more Drugs according to Daniel Hanbury

RPS Elections – your opportunity to meet candidates for the RPS Boards

by Neal Patel, RPS Head of Communications and Engagement

Every year the RPS asks members and Fellows of the Society to stand as Board Members in England, Scotland and Wales. This year we have elections in both England and Wales, but not in Scotland.

To allow all RPS members to find out more about the candidates in Wales and England we are holding an online question and answer session – also known as ‘hustings’ – between 7pm and 8pm on the 17th of April. Read more RPS Elections – your opportunity to meet candidates for the RPS Boards

Working at system level on care homes

by Wasim Baqir, National pharmacy lead on care homes, NHS England

NHS England has announced 180 new jobs for pharmacists and 60 for pharmacy technicians as part of the drive to improve patient care and the use of medicines in care homes.  At a system level, here’s how it will work – and I promise, it’s not as hard as it sounds!

STPs/ICS

The NHS and local councils came together in 2016 to form 44 Sustainability and Transformation Partnerships (STPs) with a vision to improve health and care for local people across whole areas rather than individual organisations. Following on from the Vanguard programme, the NHS announced 10 Integrated Care Systems (ICS) that have been given greater operational and financial autonomy to manage their services. Read more Working at system level on care homes

Prescribing a revolution

by Robbie Turner, RPS Director for England

During my career as a pharmacist, who is able to prescribe has changed beyond recognition.

From nurses through to pharmacists and allied healthcare professionals, more and more of us are studying for a prescribing qualification. It’s driving a revolution in healthcare and increasing access for patients.

The NHS needs solutions to the pressures it faces and maximising the skill mix of the existing workforce as part of the push for more integrated care is giving the profession significant opportunities. Read more Prescribing a revolution

No you don’t need a PhD to pursue a career in the Pharmaceutical Industry!

Professor Luigi G Martini FRPharmS, FEIPG, Chief Pharmaceutical Scientist for the Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

Nor do you need to have done an Industrial pre-registration programme either! These are the two most commonly cited questions, or should I say myths, which are often directed at me.

So I have taken the opportunity in this blog to dispel a few myths as follows:

1) You do not need to have a PhD to work in industry, but it does help if you want to work in Research and Drug Discovery. However, there are many roles in Product Development, Manufacturing and Commercial which exist for pharmacists.

2) You do not need to undertake a pre-registration year in industry, and with only 11 such programmes in the UK, they are highly competitive and thus restricted with respect to demand. In fact, pharmacists who have trained and worked in community and hospital are highly regarded by the industry.

3) There has never been a better time to join the industry with pharmacists being highly desired for career paths in Medical Affairs, Regulatory Affairs, Pharmacovigilance and Quality Assurance.

Read more No you don’t need a PhD to pursue a career in the Pharmaceutical Industry!

The Hanbury Collection at the RPS Library

By Karen Horn, RPS Librarian 

(with painting of Daniel Hanbury)

Daniel Hanbury (1825-1875) was a leading British pharmacologist. Since 1892, his notable book collection, predominantly on pharmacognosy and botany, has formed part of the RPS Library collection.  So how do we come to own it and what are we doing to make it more accessible to members?

Thomas’ and Anna’s loss, our gain …

The Royal Pharmaceutical Society might never have been in possession of Daniel Hanbury’s books if his sister, Anna, had not moved house. Although his brother, Thomas, had intended to give them to the Society, he had found it difficult to part with them.  The books had been housed with Anna after Daniel Hanbury’s death in 1875, and her imminent move meant that a final decision had to be made about their future location. Read more The Hanbury Collection at the RPS Library

The history of cosmetics – unwrapped

By Matthew Johnston, RPS Museum

‘Removes blotches,’ ‘clears the complexion,’ ‘removes freckles, pimples, and all spots.’

Turn on your TV or open a magazine and you might see these words advertising the latest beauty product, but in fact they come from the Roman writer Pliny the Elder’s description of a substance called crocodilea – the dung or intestinal contents of a crocodile.

As well as its uses in skincare it was recommended as an eye salve, taken internally for epilepsy, and as a pessary for stimulating menstrual flow.

Partnerships
In 2016 the RPS Museum became a partner in a research project on ancient skincare, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council’s Science in Culture strand. Now, as the study reaches its conclusion, the team – including researchers from the Universities of Oxford, Glasgow and Keele – are going to showcase some of the findings in a series of events at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society on 15th and 16th  February. Read more The history of cosmetics – unwrapped

The ‘FIP Bug’

By Kiri Aikman, Clinical Writer for Pharmaceutical Press

I caught the ‘FIP bug’ after attending my first world congress in Dublin in 2013. It was unexpected. I’d been to plenty of conferences before, but this one was different. The sheer scale, with around 3,000 delegates from over 20 counties, blew me away. Every attendee was passionate about enhancing pharmacy practice and used this international gathering to showcase their amazing work and learn about improving patient care.

FIP is the International Pharmaceutical Federation; the global voice of pharmacists and pharmaceutical scientists. Being my first international conference, and as a junior pharmacist from little old New Zealand, I was more than a little nervous walking into this prestigious event. What I quickly learnt though, was that FIP was more of a pharmacy family; sharing ideas and opinions with like-minded people. They even have a “first timers” programme to ease you in and instantly make you feel comfortable.

Read more The ‘FIP Bug’

Antimicrobial stewardship – are you doing your bit?

by Jacquie Sneddon, Project Lead for the Scottish Antimicrobial Prescribing Group

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is one of the top threats to human healthcare with an estimated 50,000 deaths per year from resistant infection across Europe and the US. This figure will reach 10 million by 2050 unless we act now to tackle antimicrobial resistance.

With few new antibiotics in the pipeline we need to ensure we are using antibiotics appropriately – this means cut out unnecessary use and ensure when they are required that prescriptions comply with evidence-based guidance. This is the basis of antimicrobial stewardship. So what does this mean for pharmacists?

AMS is important in all sectors of pharmacy

Read more Antimicrobial stewardship – are you doing your bit?