Minding the Gap – Improving care for young people in Wales

by Ross Gregory, Head of External Relations, Royal Pharmaceutical Society in Wales

Ross Gregory, Head of External Relations, RPS Wales
Ross Gregory, Head of External Relations, RPS Wales

Minding the Gap

 

Meeting the needs of young people as they transition from child to adult services has long been a challenging issue. Pharmacists, paediatricians, psychiatrists, GPs and a whole host of other health and social care professionals are involved in these arrangements. Yet, despite the commitment and hard work of individual professionals, transition remains an area where sadly, many young people are let down by the system and where, more critically, their health and wellbeing can be compromised.

Understanding where the gaps are in the system and how they can be overcome is vitally important to provide children and young people with the safe and effective care they deserve.

 

Taking action in Wales

 

This issue is attracting attention in Wales as the Children’s Commissioner for Wales continues to push for the rights of children and Young people.

The Commissioner has recognised that pharmacists have an important role in transition arrangements, particularly for young people with multi-morbidities and complex conditions.  It was a pleasure therefore to be invited to join the Children’s Commissioner, colleagues from other royal colleges and Welsh Government officials last week to look at the issues in more detail with a view to improving the current state of play in Wales.

Read more Minding the Gap – Improving care for young people in Wales

Current EU rules restrict access to new, potentially life-saving cancer treatments in children

IMG_0636by Jackie Turner, Macmillan Principal Pharmacist Oncology & Haematology

Around 1,600 children are diagnosed with cancer in the UK every year.

But is there enough paediatric research to allow more testing of potentially life-saving cancer drugs?  

Currently, the EU Regulations allow pharmaceutical companies to opt out of children’s trials if a new drug is intended for an adult cancer that does not occur in children.

What does this mean? Read more Current EU rules restrict access to new, potentially life-saving cancer treatments in children