Don’t put off your pre-reg exam revision

Pre-reg revision course speaker, NadiaBy Nadia Bukhari, Senior Teaching Fellow & Pre-reg coordinator, UCL School of Pharmacy

Have you started thinking about your knowledge gaps and what your revision should look like between now and the exam in the summer? You may well think that the GPhC summer assessment is so far away that its too early to think about it now. However from my experience in working very closely with pre-reg trainees over several years, those who begin making plans in January are far more likely to pass the exam come June.

The best place to kick off your preparation for the assessment is at the RPS pre-registration revision course in London on the 26-27 January and there are several reasons for this.

As a mentor for emerging young leaders taking an active interest in their development and building their skills, I have an invested interest in pre-registration trainees getting the results they want when the GPhC release the results later in the year.

Don’t wait, get in early

Joining an RPS revision course early is the best thing you can do and this can really set you up for the remainder of your pre-registration year and beyond. This year, delegates will be allowed to take their mock exam papers away, which will be invaluable in helping to identify and address the knowledge gaps over the following months. You will also have a great opportunity to network and meet new peers who could be a really important part of your support or social network going forward, as well as the contact you will have with some of the top experts in pre-registration and early years pharmacy. These interactions should not be underestimated and the courses provide a fantastic platform for this.

What you can expect from the pre-reg revision course

The courses have been designed by a team of expert professionals to give pre-registration trainees a real taste for what the GPhC exam requires to pass and what it feels like to actually take part in one. Please take a look at an example programme.

The first day offers an intense overview of the exam contents and aims to bring everyone up to speed ready for the mini mock on day two. You will be taken through core topics such as, the essentials of pharmacy law and ethics, pharmaceutical calculations and high risk drugs and therapeutic drug monitoring.

The second day is a mini mock exam, sat in full exam conditions to give you the ideal preparation ahead of the real thing! This year, for the first time, you will be able to take the exam away so you can use it for your own revision at home.

Our revision courses have been a great success for many years now and the feedback is always great. We know that of our members who attended one of our courses last year, 91% of them went on to pass the exam. A previous delegate said that the course is “vital to knowing what to expect in the exam and how to plan forward revision”.

Don’t hesitate and book your place at one of the RPS pre-reg revision courses now to give yourself the best chance of passing the exam and making it to practice.

Build a successful grant application

Successful grant application writer

by Justine Tomlinson, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust

Here is my experience in building a successful grant application. With a background in community pharmacy, and in terms of research I’d only ever been involved with company audit and practice questionnaires. Starting my PhD was a challenging experience for a number of reasons; the main one being that I needed to prepare a grant application for funding. I absolutely did not know where to start or what I required in order to give myself the best chances of being successful. It all felt rather overwhelming!

I decided to attend the RPS’ two-day Research Proposal Writing workshop (early 2017) facilitated by Professor Felicity Smith, to see what I could learn in the way of ‘grantsmanship’. The different sessions within the workshop touched on absolutely everything that I needed to know to begin building a successful application – from creating a sound research plan to enlisting co-applicants and utilising public and patient involvement effectively.

The small group size was great. This meant there was time to discuss everyone’s ideas and develop personal action plans. It was encouraging to be able to talk about my own research with like-minded individuals and get feedback from the RPS research team and Felicity. We also had the opportunity to speak with other pharmacists who had won grants and were embarking on their research journeys. Hearing from them was truly inspirational.

Following the workshop, the RPS research team have continued to provide an amazing amount of support. It took me four months to build my application for the NIHR Research for Patient Benefit competition. I put everything into practice that I learnt during the workshop and I am pleased to report that I have been successful at stage one of the competition. I am continuing to utilise the knowledge and skills from the workshop to build my stage two application (outcome due early 2018).

If you are struggling to get started with your research grant funding application then book onto our two day Research Proposal Writing workshop, led by expert Professor Felicity Smith of UCL School of Pharmacy.


Write a winning abstract for conferences

Poster display

Write a winning abstract and submit for our inaugural Winter Summit.

Want to hear about the latest innovations in medicines and pharmacy? Looking to get your M.Pharm project published in an international journal? Interested in a career in academia or pharmaceutical science?

Explore the latest innovations in pharmaceutical science and research and get your work published. Join us for the RPS Winter Summit!


A new event in the RPS calendar, the Winter Summit will bring together experts from within pharmacy and pharmaceutical science for a programme of cutting edge topics: big data, drug development and the future of education to name a few.

Submit an abstract

Abstract submissions for oral or poster presentation are welcomed from across the science and research spectrum, so whether you have been working in the lab or on a patient-facing project, we have an opportunity for you.

  • Pharmaceutical science and early stage clinical research will be published in the Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology (Impact Factor 2.405)
  • Health service research and pharmacy practice will be published in the International Journal of Pharmacy Practice

For more information about the submissions process and guidance visit the webpage here

Get help from the RPS in writing your abstract

  • So what is an abstract? An abstract is a concise summary of a project that allows readers to quickly identify its novelty, rigour and potential impact. Writing an abstract is an opportunity to share evidence widely and is a key component of most professional conferences; it is also an excellent starting point for those new to research looking to get their work recognised.
  • Writing winning abstracts. An abstract should be a summary of a project with a clear aim and concise design, method and results with meaningful conclusion.

Join us on September 7th for an instructional webinar to help prepare your abstract. The webinar will review abstract structure and give helpful tips on judging criteria and common pitfalls

Submit your abstract by 5pm GMT on 11 September or book now to secure your place at the Winter Summit 2017.

Think leadership isn’t for you? Think again

marianneby Marianne MacDonald, RPS Leadership Workstream Project Manager

Think of a great leader you’ve worked with in your career

Was it someone who swooped in to ‘save the day’, imposing an autocratic vision for change? Or was it someone in the background who engaged a whole team to care enough to want to make a difference?

Often if we are asked to think of a great leader, it’s an example of the former – the ‘hero’ leader – that automatically springs to mind. While this type of leader has a role (usually in a crisis situation), it also means that leadership is reserved for the very few in the upper echelons of an organisation. It’s also an outmoded concept of leadership. Read more Think leadership isn’t for you? Think again