Our mentoring relationship

Being a mentee: Aamir Sheikh

I met my mentor Aamer Safdar whilst working at Kings College London. I was the 3rd year Professional Lead, and was introduced to him and he told me about his background, both personal and professional.  Just by listening to him, I knew that his values were similar to my own. 

Challenge

I now work at BUPA as the Chief Pharmaceutical Officer’s Clinical Fellow, but before that I worked within the Education Directorate at RPS.  It was there I worked alongside Aamer in projects involving undergraduates.  You will hear that pharmacy is a small world and this is one such example!  My manager explained how it is important to work alongside colleagues who will challenge your thinking and I found this in Aamer.  Our mentor/mentee relationship first established when we went out for dinner as a post-work group; it was here when I decided to formalise my mentor/mentee relationship with him. 

Benefits

I’ve benefited greatly from the mentor/mentee relationship. It’s given me thinking space but its been advantageous to both my personal and professional life to have someone to challenge my own thinking in whatever situation or scenario I am experiencing.  In our last meeting Aamer and I spoke about authenticity, congruence and integrity.  I found it particularly useful hearing from someone in Aamer’s position, a current GPhC Council member and previous RPS English Pharmacy Board member, about how important it is to stay true to your own values and what these values really mean.

We use the RPS mentor platform to record our meetings and have found that, as well as the normal methods of keeping in touch, the platform has been beneficial in keeping us focused. I couldn’t stress the importance of having a mentor enough.  It has really helped me focus whenever I have found myself in a sticky situation and I’m grateful for the time Aamer has shared with me.

Being a Mentor: Aamer Safdar

I have been a mentor to many people inside and outside of pharmacy and have used a variety of methods with my mentees which have included traditional face to face sessions as well as mentoring exclusively by email and by phone; in the latter two cases, I never met my mentees in real life until much later in our relationships! 

I currently mentor two pharmacists, at different stages in their careers, using the RPS mentoring platform.  The platform is useful because I have outlined the areas in which I would like to mentor in to manage my mentees’ expectations. 

Sharing experiences

In both of my meetings, we spoke about our careers and challenges at different levels and I was able to share my experiences and wisdom from both my day job and from being in national boards.  Much of my wisdom has come from my own mentors, who have been different people at different stages of my career,and with different perspectives and advice.  Without a mentor to bounce things off, I doubt I would have done many of the things I have done in my career.

Find out more about our mentoring scheme exclusively for members

Strengthening Antimicrobial Stewardship through training

by Vincent Ng, Professional Development Pharmacist

The challenge   

This year the UK Government updated its 5 year action plan on Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR), which details ambitious goals such as reducing antimicrobial usage in humans by 15% and halving gram negative blood stream infections by 2024.

A major part of this plan involves improving how antimicrobials are used through Antimicrobial Stewardship, for example by reducing inappropriate prescribing. As experts in medicines and advocates for medicines optimisation, all pharmacists have a role to play.

Supporting pharmacists through training

Earlier this year, we delivered a 3-month training programme to pharmacists from primary and secondary care in London, Kent, Surrey and Sussex, funded by the Health Education England AMR Innovation Fund. This was an exciting opportunity for us to support pharmacists from a range of settings and scopes of practice to learn about Antimicrobial Stewardship and get involved in their workplace.

What did the training involve?

  • Face-to-Face training day delivered by national experts
  • Quality improvement project in the workplace, supported by online group feedback sessions facilitated by UKCPA Pharmacy Infection Network tutors
  • Structured self-assessment and self-directed learning
  • GPhC revalidation entries
  • End of training assessment with experts from our Antimicrobial Expert Advisory Group

What our learners are saying

“I was given the opportunity to be part of the AMR programme this year and found the programme very useful. It has propelled me in the right direction with regards to leading on AMR within my organisation.  The key resources provided during the programme and the link to a tutor gave the confidence I needed to complete my project. My quality improvement project involved the review of patients with UTI to ensure appropriate prescribing and accurate documentation process.  Although the project was only focused on a small cohort it was very useful to see the changes and improvement that was made. I have not just stopped with the project but have also made myself an AMR champion with AMR now formally included in my work plan. I am now creating a training matrix to increase awareness within my organisation.”

Jenkeo Olowoloba, Community Health Specialist Pharmacist, Medway Community Healthcare

“The training helped me develop my skills as a competent and confident AMS practitioner. Participating in this training programme enabled me to significantly improve my quality improvement skills, extending my skills beyond audits and re audits. I demonstrated QI methodology and embedded behavioural interventions to improve the quality of the 72-hour antibiotic review carried out by clinicians.  I also designed a scoring tool on the Perfect Ward App to measure the quality of an antibiotic review which led to reducing data collection time from 15 minutes to 5 minutes. I enjoyed the entire experience and valued the constant support provided by our tutors, RPS team and colleagues. The practice-based discussions benefitted my practice significantly, being able to share ideas and learn from experts as well as each other. Thank you RPS for an amazing opportunity!

Bairavi Indrakumar, Senior Clinical Pharmacist, Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust

Getting started

Take the first step by finding out more about how your organisation is doing against key AMS indicators. Work with your peers and colleagues to better understand how things are working. PHE Fingertips and OpenPrescribing.net are examples of useful open-access sources of data that you can explore.

Talk to your key stakeholders to come up with shared objectives and work together on a plan to make improvements.

Inspire and get inspiration

Why not link up with others who are also working on AMS and AMR?

Women in leadership: believe and achieve!

by Amandeep Doll, RPS Regional Liaison Pharmacist

This year I am delighted to be co-chairing our Women in Leadership event on 3rd October 2019 with the RPS President Sandra Gidley.  We had an incredible response to our event last year and want this year to be even bigger and better!

Believe and Achieve

The theme of this years event is Believe and Achieve. The day is full of practical advice and workshops to help you believe in yourself, celebrate your successes and be comfortable with your ambition. We have sessions with Clare Howard and Frances Akor who are current leaders; they will be sharing who their role models are and what values they believe you need to be successful.

Women are often negatively labelled according to their personality traits such as ‘too aggressive’ when they’ve demonstrated confidence in their roles, and others have included ‘too serious’, ‘too questioning,’ ‘too emotional’ and ‘too caring’.

You’ll learn how to achieve your next leadership role by challenging these stereotypes, as well as getting practical advice on how to overcome difficulties, increase your resilience and craft a winning CV.  We have workshops by Harpreet Chana and Heather Fraser from IBM on increasing your confidence and position yourself to get that leadership post.

To embrace the diversity of experiences and beliefs that women bring to leadership teams we also have a men as allies session, to celebrate the differences between men and women and how we can work together to be a successful team.

You’ll leave the event feeling more confident to apply for and take on leadership roles and also to support female colleagues to take those steps to becoming a great leader. 

Come and take part in our Women in Leadership event on 3rd October.

A question of confidence

by pharmacist Harpreet Chana, certified professional coach, speaker, trainer and founder of the Mental Wealth Academy

I am so excited to be leading a workshop on confidence at the RPS Women in Leadership Event! After attending the event last year and learning that the main barrier we face as women in progressing up the ranks within our sector was confidence, I wanted to run a workshop to address this issue and am delighted to be doing so.

Never too late

From my own experience, I understand that confidence, resilience, emotional intelligence and better outer/inner communication are essential life and leadership skills. They enable us to be mentally tough, deal with life’s challenges and are core skills that help reduce the impact of mental health on performance and life fulfilment. We are not taught these at school or university, but the good news is, it’s not too late! We can still learn these vital skills and how to apply them to our daily lives so that we are all much healthier and happier individuals as a result.

Confidence matters

How confident are you really? Has there ever been a time where a lack of confidence has stopped you from going for what you really want? From speaking up? From asking for a pay rise/promotion? From putting yourself forward for opportunities at work or at home?

How do you talk to yourself on a daily basis? Are you very critical of yourself if you make a mistake or can you forgive yourself and seize the opportunity to grow and learn from every slip-up? No matter how confident we think we are, there are always times when a lack of confidence or our biggest fears can hold us back from achieving our true potential. My confidence mini masterclass will help you to address how you see yourself and to appreciate how truly awesome you really are!

Come and take part in Harpreet’s workshop at our Women in Leadership event on 3rd October.

Diabetes: the team approach

By Philip Newland-Jones and Anna Hodgkinson, Consultant Pharmacists in Diabetes

People with diabetes need the support of a full multidisciplinary team more than ever, and utilising pharmacists trained in diabetes care are an essential part of this vision.

Statistics from Diabetes UK show that one person is diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes every three minutes in England and Wales, and 500 people with diabetes die prematurely every week.  It is estimated that the NHS currently spends 10% or £10 billion of its annual budget on diabetes and its complications.

We know that over 65 year olds with Type 2 diabetes have on average six to seven other health concerns, often needing multiple medicines. Both the Long Term Plan and the NHS Interim People Plan recognise the value and impact pharmacists can have to improve outcomes for people living with long term conditions, including diabetes. This paper outlines a clear vision for pharmacy and the need for the NHS to utilise pharmacists alongside other healthcare professionals across all care settings to improve the care of people with Type 2 diabetes.

In the past, pharmacists have held a more traditional but key role in the management of diabetes, including being an integral part of improving medicines safety and supporting medicines optimisation. Over the past few years, recognising the skills and positive impact on care pharmacists can have both with individuals and at a population health level, we have seen a change in mindset. Increased numbers of pharmacists are now working in diabetes and Consultant Pharmacist posts have been developed. Although this is a start, as highly trained and skilled professionals, we know we can do more whether this is at a GP practice, care home, a community pharmacy, hospital, or Integrated Care System level.

The direction of travel for pharmacy in the management of Type 2 diabetes is clear. We have a huge role to play alongside our healthcare professional colleagues in improving outcomes for people with Type 2 diabetes, after all supporting people with diabetes needs the full multidisciplinary team more than ever.

We are excited for the opportunities that the RPS policy document, The Long Term Plan and NHS Interim People Plan will bring for pharmacy and we look forward to working with the profession over the coming days, months and years to promote and support the role of pharmacists within all care settings to improve outcomes for people living with Type 2 diabetes.

It is important to note that pharmacists cannot do this alone, we need the right environment for development, the support and mentoring from colleagues with experience in diabetes care such as practice nurses, diabetes specialist nurses, GP’s, specialist dietitians, podiatrists.  The only way we are going to be able to effectively tackle diabetes across all care sectors is to ensure this seamless teamworking and collaboration is encouraged and cultivated.

We’ve got two things to ask of you:

  • If you are a pharmacist, and you are interested in supporting people with diabetes then please ensure you have thought over what competencies you need to develop using the UKCPA Integrated Career and Competency Framework for pharmacists in Diabetes
  • If you are a healthcare professional working in diabetes in any sector of the NHS, think if your team would benefit from the support of a pharmacist, and if you work with a pharmacist embrace and support their development to ensure they are the best they can be for your team and your patients.

Why Pride matters


By Gareth Kitson, RPS Professional Development and Engagement Lead

I had known for a long time that I was gay but had never had to acknowledge it. I never engaged with the LGBT+ community at Uni as I had a ready-made group of friends. I wasn’t confident enough to engage with members of the community as I felt I had to behave in a certain way.  After moving to London I was pushed into the one of the most vibrant and diverse communities in the world and wasn’t ready for the effect it would have on me.

Fitting in

Every aspect of the LGBT+ community had “tribes” or “communities” and I really struggled to find my place.  I also found it really hard to make friends outside of a dating environment.  Most gay men will tell you the same story – insecurity, isolation and the struggle to “fit in”. 

In July 2012 I was out shopping on Oxford Street and accidentally stumbled on the Pride in London Parade.  I felt overwhelmed, curious and confused as to what was happening.  I stopped and watched the entire Parade pass by and spent the rest of the day reflecting on what I had just seen.

Not alone

For the first time, I suddenly felt that I wasn’t alone.  I suddenly realised that there were other people living in the same city as me who identified as a member of the LGBT+ community.  There were opportunities to meet people who may have gone through the same experiences as you, be it coming to terms with your own identity or coming out to your family and friends. 

This one day showed me that people from all backgrounds can stand next to each other and be proud of who they are.  That families can gather and show their children that it is OK for a man to love a man and that some of their friends may have two mummies instead of a mummy and a daddy. 

It was heart-warming, confidence-boosting and empowering when I finally realised that I wasn’t alone.  That I could live my life as I wanted, being true to who I really was, in the city I now called home. That’s why Pride matters.

Members of staff and members of the RPS will be walking in the Parade on 6th July. If you see us, give us a wave #wearepharmacy.

System leadership: how to get involved

By Amandeep Doll, RPS Regional Liaison Pharmacist

The NHS landscape is always changing and it can be difficult to know where to start for pharmacists who want to get involved in their local health and care systems.

You may have recently heard a lot about ‘systems’ in healthcare – but what are they really about? In short, they mean working collaboratively across health and social care boundaries to improve patient and public outcomes.

Current systems

The systems in England which plan, organise and deliver health and care services are called Integrated Care Systems (ICS), Sustainability and Transformation Partnerships (STPs) and Primary Care Networks (PCNs). The NHS Long Term Plan will be delivered through these systems, which will work in collaboration with existing commissioning, secondary care providers and local authorities.

Pharmacists must be part of these structures at leadership level to ensure the future success of the profession at every level of practice. Our impact in systems is maximised when we integrate with the wider health and social care team.

Our challenge

The challenge for pharmacists is to deliver system-wide medicines optimisation, creating a collective sense of responsibility across different areas of pharmacy, organisations and individuals. This has the potential to dramatically improve population health.

To do this, pharmacists must be formally recognised by these systems and a framework established to support pharmacy integration and build a collaborative approach.

But where on earth do you start? If you’re keen to get involved, we can help you explore leadership opportunities within healthcare.

We can help

Our brand new online tool A systems approach to medicines optimisation and pharmacy will help you navigate the opportunities for pharmacy service development and medicines optimisation within local health and care systems.

It identifies six ways you can support effective system leadership and is packed full of practical advice to encourage collaborative working. It also provides checklists of the resources, standards and guidance needed to build knowledge and skills, along with case studies of how pharmacists have improved medicines optimisation and patient care.

A systems approach to medicines optimisation and pharmacy is part of our support for members working to improve medicines optimisation. I really hope that other pharmacists will contribute their experiences and share good practice in this rapidly changing environment. We need to see what works and what doesn’t so we can all learn to lead better.

Why not submit your own leadership case study?

Download our case study template and email it to england@rpharms.com

Related resource: Medicines Optimisation

Salbutamol – landmark asthma treatment

by John Betts, Keeper of the RPS Museum

2019 marks the 50th anniversary of the landmark asthma treatment Salbutamol becoming commercially available in the UK. Salbutamol is still widely used today to relieve symptoms of asthma and COPD such as coughing, wheezing and feeling breathless. It works by relaxing the muscles of the airways into the lungs, making it easier to breathe.

Launched in 1969 with the brand name Ventolin, Salbutamol revolutionised the treatment of bronchial asthma.

It treated bronchospasm far more effectively compared with previous bronchodilators and had fewer side effects.

To understand how much of a breakthrough Salbutamol was in the treatment of asthma, it’s first worth comparing it to the drugs that were used to treat asthma before 1969.

One of the main drugs used for treating asthma in the mid-1960s was isoprenaline. This is a powerful bronchodilator and was used to relieve bronchospasm. However, the side effects include a sudden increased heart rate. Between 1963 and 1968 in the UK there was an increase in deaths among people using isoprenaline to treat asthma. This was attributed to overdose due to both excessive use of the aerosols and the high dosage they dispensed.

In the mid-1960s the mortality rate for asthma sufferers had risen to over 2,000 deaths a year. An effective bronchodilator was desperately needed that did not stimulate the heart or affect blood pressure.

Salbutamol was discovered in 1966 by a research team at Allen and Hanburys (a subsidiary of Glaxo). Salbutamol was the first drug that selectively targeted specific receptors in the lungs, inhibiting the production of proteins needed to produce muscle contractions. It works by relaxing the smooth muscle of the airways, opening them up and so lessening or preventing an asthma attack. Not only was Salbutamol a good bronchodilator, it lasted longer than isoprenaline, and inhalation caused fewer side effects.

In addition to the effectiveness of the drug, the method of administration itself was also revolutionary. The Ventolin inhaler was designed to ensure metered aerosol doses of Salbutamol were inhaled straight into the patient’s lungs.

The drug was an instant success.

The only real deficiency of Salbutamol was its short duration of action; at 4 hours it couldn’t prevent night-time asthma attacks. In response to this the pharmaceutical manufacturer Glaxo aimed to develop a longer acting drug. The result of their research was Salmeterol. Launched in 1990 with the brand name Serevent, it had a 12-hour duration of action.

50 years on Salbutamol is still on the World Health Organization’s List of Essential Medicines; a testament to the major role it continues to play in the treatment of asthma. 

Visit the RPS Museum Mon-Fri 9am-5pm

From community pharmacist to Medical Science Liaison

Sinead Monaghan, Medical Science Liaison, Sanofi

I graduated with a master’s degree in pharmacy from Queen’s University Belfast.I undertook my pre-registration year in a community pharmacy chain in Northern Ireland. I was employed as a pharmacist manager with the same company post pre-registration year. I spent a further four years as a community pharmacist.

I thoroughly enjoyed this role, especially being a pharmacist tutor. This very much sparked my interest in training others. I had always been curious about alternative pharmacist roles, but felt my knowledge of career paths was limited.

Read more From community pharmacist to Medical Science Liaison

How Sarah became a Medical Science Liaison

Dr. Sarah Anne Goffin, Medical Science Liaison at Sanofi

I come from a family of healthcare professionals and have always been passionate about science, so pharmacy seemed to be a perfect fit for me. 

I undertook my undergraduate at the University of East Anglia between 2006 and 2010 and completed my pre-registration year in 2011. As I worked part-time as a counter assistant in community during my degree I wanted to take the opportunity to increase my experience in hospital pharmacy. 

Read more How Sarah became a Medical Science Liaison