Why visible leadership matters

During LGBTQ+ history month, two deputy chief pharmacists tell us what visible leadership means to them

Rajiv Pandya, Deputy Chief Pharmacist Dudley & Walsall MH Trust

For me, leadership is about being able to be authentic and to allow my personality to be intrinsic to my leadership style. As a professional, feeling able to show the whole of my identity hasn’t always been easy and I have often struggled in terms of whether to be open about being a gay man in the workplace.  I’ve worked in a whole plethora of teams within the NHS and I found that how comfortable I felt about being open about my sexuality differed significantly depending on the organisation I worked in.

One of my most significant negative interactions was when working as a pharmacist visiting a GP surgery to support with their medicines optimisation work streams.

I remember the homophobic conversations in the room which made me feel uncomfortable and I remember almost feeling that I had recoiled into a shell of who I truly was. I remember feeling physically uncomfortable, which impacted on my interactions with the staff and my focus to carry out the task at hand.

On the other hand, the culture within my current organisation is very different. A culture of openness and equality and diversity is high up on the trust’s agenda.

I feel I am able to be my authentic self, which I believe brings richness to my leadership and helps me to establish meaningful professional relationships based on trust and mutual understanding.  Ultimately, I feel I work more effectively in my role which benefits my team and leads to better patient care. I feel empowered within my organisation and I have also taken on the role as chair of the trust’s LGBTQ+ committee, which comes at an exciting time as we begin to prepare our plans for Birmingham Pride.

I am likely to be one of many LGBTQ+ people who have had these experiences and this is why I believe visible diversity and inclusion within leadership is so important. We need more visible LGBTQ+ role models to ensure our workforce feels empowered and enabled to shine as their authentic selves as it will lead to increased confidence, motivation and ultimately positively impact the quality of care we provide to our patients.




Sam Malton, Deputy Chief Pharmacist, University Hospitals Derby & Burton

I work in a teaching hospital. I am also gay. I also have type 1 diabetes. I’ve also struggled with my mental health. Sounds a lot? Perhaps, but there’s not much I can do to change any of it. Instead I accept the challenges and do not allow them to hold me back.

I’ve had a varied and interesting career to date and leadership has been at the heart of it. I’ve watched leaders and their styles over the years and this has helped to develop my own leadership.  Interacting with leaders of other professions, with whom I work closely has also taught me a lot.

I can honestly say that being gay has never affected my career. My sexuality has always been accepted, from being a student, up to the present day. I was worried at university about the demographic of my peers being different to mine, but I was lucky to have a large and diverse friendship group. I’ve watched gay leaders in pharmacy with respect and really feel that sexuality has been a non-issue in my career.

In 2016 I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes out of the blue. This led to a very difficult episode of anxiety and depression, having lived with anxiety all of my life. I felt like my career was over and could not imagine ever leaving the comfort of my role at the time. I knew that I wanted to be a leader and develop further – but could not see how I could ever do that.

Thanks to support from various leaders, I was able to get back to normal over a few months. I began to develop my leadership again and thanks to visible and honest leaders who showed interest in me, I took the next step in my career.

In all this I learned a valuable lesson that leaders are not perfect. They are human and have the same individual challenges as everyone else. I was surprised to learn how many leaders struggle with anxiety. It’s taught me that with the right mind set anything is possible. As a leader I can be confident and anxious at the same time. I can do my job and not worry about hypos, so long as I have sweets in my pocket. I can openly talk about my male fiancé and not be judged. I feel privileged to be in this position and to have had the same chances as everyone else.

Find out more about our work on Inclusion and Diversity

Parental leave and returning to work

by Elen Jones, Director for RPS Wales, and Robbie Turner, RPS Director of Pharmacy and Member Experience

Elen Jones

Elen: Swapping the baby wipes, nappies and the bottles for policies, business plans and strategic meetings.

Maternity leave is over. In a blink of an eye, my baby boy is babbling away and walking round the furniture. He’s nine months, I just about feel like I’m getting to grips with being a mum of two and all of a sudden, it’s time to go back to work.

It’s been amazing to spend so much time with the boys; watching the little one develop and being able to take my eldest to school every day as he starts nursery has been brilliant. On the flip side, it’s often felt chaotic. The demands of two children are something else!

Three weeks into maternity leave I attended an interview and was fortunate enough to get a new role as Director of RPS Wales. 

It’s such a privilege to be returning to work and starting this role. I definitely had huge anxiety during the days leading up to my return. How will we cope with getting the boys to nursery and all be out the door by 8am? How will I catch up on the last 9 months? RPS think I’m the right person for the job, but what will members and my team really think? Impostor syndrome was creeping in! I did check out the RPS Return to Practice guide which helped allay some of my worries. I’ve been back in work for two weeks, and I miss my boys very much. Fortunately, my youngest has settled into nursery quite well (better than his big brother did!)

If I’m really honest, I’m actually feeling more like me again. I’m back to feeling more in control, enthused by the work and by my colleagues.  I’m full of ideas, getting out there and speaking to like-minded pharmacists. I’ve caught up with lots of our members already, everyone’s been so kind and supportive.

The sleepless nights unfortunately don’t stop when you return to work, but I don’t mind them as much now, time with the boys has become more precious. I so look forward to getting back from work to their big smiles and hugs.

So, a big thank you to all my colleagues and our amazing members for all the support and your patience while I’ve been away! I look forward to working with you all to make sure RPS and pharmacy continue to go from strength to strength.

Robbie Turner

Robbie: This year I’m going to get an extra three months off work. And, I’ve been surprisingly anxious about it.

Not that pre-holiday anxious when you’re trying to work out exactly how much ludicrously expensive sun cream to pack so you don’t need to bring any back with you. No, it’s a feeling that’s hard to describe but I bet there are millions or people (mainly women) who have experienced it even more deeply than me.

My partner Ben and I are soon (everything crossed) going to adopt two children. We’ve been aiming to make this a reality for over a year now. A big thank you to work friends and colleagues who have given me support and advice over the last year. Your words of encouragement have been hugely helpful. But, nobody warned me about this bit – preparing for paternity leave.

I know we’re lucky at RPS to have a good paternity leave entitlement. As part of our work on inclusion and diversity we identified that our gender pay gap was too high and introducing paternity pay was one of the tools we put in place to start to be a better employer for both men and women. Check out this article “Men’s parental leave is key to women’s progression

I’d like to think that I’ve always been supportive of women (and I think it has always been women who’ve taken any form of parental leave in my teams) when they announce the news that they are pregnant. I’ve cried a few times, but that’s always been with excitement rather than thinking about covering their maternity leave! I know this isn’t the experience of lots of women and that’s one of the reasons why I’m committed to taking my full paternity allowance. What I’ve never considered is what could be going through an expectant mother’s mind when they’re thinking about taking parental leave. And I now have a small insight into both their perceptions AND the realities..

I work with a great team who are brilliant at their jobs.  Even then, I’m worried about the added pressure me going off for three months will put on them.  BUT, when I really reflect, my main worry is the complete opposite. It’s that I will get found out as a bit of a fraud. That everyone will cope just fine without me or (arghhhhh) that it will be even better when I’m not here interfering and distracting people. Will I still have a job at the end of it all? How much will the world of pharmacy have moved on – will I be able to catch back up?

So, if I’m feeling like this – a (fairly confident), white man, in a senior role, only going on paternity leave for three months – then what must it be like for others who don’t have the same privilege of gender, colour, or seniority facing up to a year away from the work place?

Now, when women (and increasingly, men) tell me their great news about their pregnancy or adoption I’ll be just as excited but I’ll also understand how stressful planning for parental leave can be. Wish me luck!

Are you returning to practice? Check out our Return to Practice guide which is packed full of practical advice and tips to help you return to the workplace with confidence.

Inclusion and diversity update

by Paul Bennett, RPS Chief Executive

As your professional body, we are now working towards an inclusion and diversity strategy for pharmacy that values difference. We want to recognise, celebrate and encourage all voices and experiences across pharmacy so we can better represent you and our patients.

I’ve had the pleasure of attending three recent events hosted by the RPS to engage with members on this really important issue. The first was a celebration during Black History Month of the BAME community’s contribution to pharmacy and we had fantastic contributions and insights shared on the day.

The second was an Inclusion & Diversity workshop which was a key milestone on the programme of work we’ve embarked on. Being authentic at work, and in turn being able to feel a sense of true belonging, is something that means so much to each of us individually and I’m keen to champion this here at the RPS. I’m a strong believer that you can only be your best self if you are allowed to be the person you truly are in your workplace, so this programme, under the guidance of our excellent Chair, Asif Sadiq MBE, will produce a strategy that we hope will resonate across the profession as well as within the RPS itself.

The third event I attended was the Retired Pharmacist Group of the RPS. It’s clear to me that older age does not mean a decline in drive, energy and enthusiasm for the profession (or for life!) and I came away feeling both inspired and thankful to have among our membership such passionate and professional people who we can all learn so much from. I do hope RPG members take up my invitation to become RPS Mentors!

Our recent I&D survey of members has highlighted that they wish us to do more in the areas of disability, race and age, and we’ll be looking at how we can do this most effectively. We’ve also got a timeline of our activity so you can track our progress.

My view is that we can only be effective at tackling I&D issues if we’re not afraid to hear about the problems and challenges faced and address them. This requires each of us to have the courage to speak up and commit to not walking past inappropriate activity where we see it. Those of us in a position to create the environment for concerns to be raised without fear should do everything we can to enable that to happen.

I said at our I&D workshop that at times I had been self-conscious as a white, middle aged, heterosexual male trying to engage in conversation about BAME and LGBT+ issues as it might be perceived that I had no credibility to do so. Having talked about this with many people, I now realise that I’m not alone in having that concern BUT that it’s better to share my perspective, understand it for what it is, listen to all the other perspectives and actively contribute to this vital agenda. No one individual can profess to speak on behalf of groups of others, as we each have a unique perspective – we are all individuals after all, even though we will identify with certain groups.

RPS can only have credibility in this space if we ‘walk the talk’. Part of our commitment is therefore to do what is right by publishing data that shows our performance as an employer striving to create equal opportunity. We already publish data on our gender pay gap here at RPS and in future I am committing that we will also publish data on ethnicity and pay. We are not required by law to do either but it’s simply the right thing to do, as we believe we should lead by example.

I encourage you to engage with this discussion about inclusion and diversity whenever and wherever you can and to champion everyone’s right to be their authentic self in the workplace. Being authentic, feeling comfortable with who we are and bringing a diversity of perspectives and views to work will enrich the RPS and help us deliver the best possible support for our members, whatever their age, race, gender or sexuality.

Uncovering hidden histories at the RPS Museum

by Matthew Johnston, RPS Museum

Part of our work here at the RPS Museum includes researching various aspects of pharmacy history so we can enrich our displays, tours and articles, especially those areas that are currently under-represented in the museum.

A recent focus of this research has been to uncover more stories relating to BAME communities. This isn’t an easy task as historical registers of pharmacists did not record information relating to ethnicity. In addition to this lack of documentary evidence, there is little visual material available, particularly in the early years of the Society before the widespread introduction of photography.

But we didn’t let that stop us. When we look through the records, we can see tantalising glimpses of stories that we can use as a starting point for our research. The earliest specific reference we have found in the Society’s archive is the arrival of the first black African student at the School of Pharmacy in 1847, as noted in the report of the Annual General Meeting of May 1848, which reflects the attitudes of the time:

It is also gratifying to find that some have come from distant countries, and one of these, an intelligent African, is probably the first native of that soil who will apply a knowledge of Chemistry acquired in an English School, with the view of promoting the arts of civilization among his colored brethren.”

But who was this student? Frustratingly he isn’t named, but he may have been Joseph Mailloux. The Society published its first list of ‘Foreign Life Members’ in the Pharmaceutical Journal in 1856 and Joseph is listed as having been admitted to membership in 1847. He was based in Mauritius, which at that time was a British colony. His certificate number of 28 shows that he took and passed one of the Society’s exams, so would have been studying at the School around the time referred to in the above report.

Despite poring over the various resources available to us, we couldn’t find out much more about Joseph Mailloux. He remains on the Society’s register until 1877, so seems to have had a 30-year career. An annotation in the Registrar’s copy of the register confirms that his removal was because he had died, but no obituary was published in either the Pharmaceutical Journal or the Chemist and Druggist, a familiar story with international members of the Society at this time.

There is still a lot of work to do in terms of including more marginalised voices in the museum. Hopefully this blog has shown that there are stories to be told and histories to be revealed – we just need to keep on digging to find them and highlight diversity in the profession.

Our mentoring relationship

Being a mentee: Aamir Shaikh

I met my mentor Aamer Safdar whilst working at Kings College London. I was the 3rd year Professional Lead, and was introduced to him and he told me about his background, both personal and professional.  Just by listening to him, I knew that his values were similar to my own. 

Challenge

I now work at BUPA as the Chief Pharmaceutical Officer’s Clinical Fellow, but before that I worked within the Education Directorate at RPS.  It was there I worked alongside Aamer in projects involving undergraduates.  You will hear that pharmacy is a small world and this is one such example!  My manager explained how it is important to work alongside colleagues who will challenge your thinking and I found this in Aamer.  Our mentor/mentee relationship first established when we went out for dinner as a post-work group; it was here when I decided to formalise my mentor/mentee relationship with him. 

Benefits

I’ve benefited greatly from the mentor/mentee relationship. It’s given me thinking space but its been advantageous to both my personal and professional life to have someone to challenge my own thinking in whatever situation or scenario I am experiencing.  In our last meeting Aamer and I spoke about authenticity, congruence and integrity.  I found it particularly useful hearing from someone in Aamer’s position, a current GPhC Council member and previous RPS English Pharmacy Board member, about how important it is to stay true to your own values and what these values really mean.

We use the RPS mentor platform to record our meetings and have found that, as well as the normal methods of keeping in touch, the platform has been beneficial in keeping us focused. I couldn’t stress the importance of having a mentor enough.  It has really helped me focus whenever I have found myself in a sticky situation and I’m grateful for the time Aamer has shared with me.

Being a Mentor: Aamer Safdar

I have been a mentor to many people inside and outside of pharmacy and have used a variety of methods with my mentees which have included traditional face to face sessions as well as mentoring exclusively by email and by phone; in the latter two cases, I never met my mentees in real life until much later in our relationships! 

I currently mentor two pharmacists, at different stages in their careers, using the RPS mentoring platform.  The platform is useful because I have outlined the areas in which I would like to mentor in to manage my mentees’ expectations. 

Sharing experiences

In both of my meetings, we spoke about our careers and challenges at different levels and I was able to share my experiences and wisdom from both my day job and from being in national boards.  Much of my wisdom has come from my own mentors, who have been different people at different stages of my career,and with different perspectives and advice.  Without a mentor to bounce things off, I doubt I would have done many of the things I have done in my career.

Find out more about our mentoring scheme exclusively for members

Strengthening Antimicrobial Stewardship through training

by Vincent Ng, Professional Development Pharmacist

The challenge   

This year the UK Government updated its 5 year action plan on Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR), which details ambitious goals such as reducing antimicrobial usage in humans by 15% and halving gram negative blood stream infections by 2024.

A major part of this plan involves improving how antimicrobials are used through Antimicrobial Stewardship, for example by reducing inappropriate prescribing. As experts in medicines and advocates for medicines optimisation, all pharmacists have a role to play.

Supporting pharmacists through training

Earlier this year, we delivered a 3-month training programme to pharmacists from primary and secondary care in London, Kent, Surrey and Sussex, funded by the Health Education England AMR Innovation Fund. This was an exciting opportunity for us to support pharmacists from a range of settings and scopes of practice to learn about Antimicrobial Stewardship and get involved in their workplace.

What did the training involve?

  • Face-to-Face training day delivered by national experts
  • Quality improvement project in the workplace, supported by online group feedback sessions facilitated by UKCPA Pharmacy Infection Network tutors
  • Structured self-assessment and self-directed learning
  • GPhC revalidation entries
  • End of training assessment with experts from our Antimicrobial Expert Advisory Group

What our learners are saying

“I was given the opportunity to be part of the AMR programme this year and found the programme very useful. It has propelled me in the right direction with regards to leading on AMR within my organisation.  The key resources provided during the programme and the link to a tutor gave the confidence I needed to complete my project. My quality improvement project involved the review of patients with UTI to ensure appropriate prescribing and accurate documentation process.  Although the project was only focused on a small cohort it was very useful to see the changes and improvement that was made. I have not just stopped with the project but have also made myself an AMR champion with AMR now formally included in my work plan. I am now creating a training matrix to increase awareness within my organisation.”

Jenkeo Olowoloba, Community Health Specialist Pharmacist, Medway Community Healthcare

“The training helped me develop my skills as a competent and confident AMS practitioner. Participating in this training programme enabled me to significantly improve my quality improvement skills, extending my skills beyond audits and re audits. I demonstrated QI methodology and embedded behavioural interventions to improve the quality of the 72-hour antibiotic review carried out by clinicians.  I also designed a scoring tool on the Perfect Ward App to measure the quality of an antibiotic review which led to reducing data collection time from 15 minutes to 5 minutes. I enjoyed the entire experience and valued the constant support provided by our tutors, RPS team and colleagues. The practice-based discussions benefitted my practice significantly, being able to share ideas and learn from experts as well as each other. Thank you RPS for an amazing opportunity!

Bairavi Indrakumar, Senior Clinical Pharmacist, Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust

Getting started

Take the first step by finding out more about how your organisation is doing against key AMS indicators. Work with your peers and colleagues to better understand how things are working. PHE Fingertips and OpenPrescribing.net are examples of useful open-access sources of data that you can explore.

Talk to your key stakeholders to come up with shared objectives and work together on a plan to make improvements.

Inspire and get inspiration

Why not link up with others who are also working on AMS and AMR?

Update! We’ve been commissioned to provide AMS training in England in 2020. Find out more and book your place.

Women in leadership: believe and achieve!

by Amandeep Doll, RPS Regional Liaison Pharmacist

This year I am delighted to be co-chairing our Women in Leadership event on 3rd October 2019 with the RPS President Sandra Gidley.  We had an incredible response to our event last year and want this year to be even bigger and better!

Believe and Achieve

The theme of this years event is Believe and Achieve. The day is full of practical advice and workshops to help you believe in yourself, celebrate your successes and be comfortable with your ambition. We have sessions with Clare Howard and Frances Akor who are current leaders; they will be sharing who their role models are and what values they believe you need to be successful.

Women are often negatively labelled according to their personality traits such as ‘too aggressive’ when they’ve demonstrated confidence in their roles, and others have included ‘too serious’, ‘too questioning,’ ‘too emotional’ and ‘too caring’.

You’ll learn how to achieve your next leadership role by challenging these stereotypes, as well as getting practical advice on how to overcome difficulties, increase your resilience and craft a winning CV.  We have workshops by Harpreet Chana and Heather Fraser from IBM on increasing your confidence and position yourself to get that leadership post.

To embrace the diversity of experiences and beliefs that women bring to leadership teams we also have a men as allies session, to celebrate the differences between men and women and how we can work together to be a successful team.

You’ll leave the event feeling more confident to apply for and take on leadership roles and also to support female colleagues to take those steps to becoming a great leader. 

Come and take part in our Women in Leadership event on 3rd October.

A question of confidence

by pharmacist Harpreet Chana, certified professional coach, speaker, trainer and founder of the Mental Wealth Academy

I am so excited to be leading a workshop on confidence at the RPS Women in Leadership Event! After attending the event last year and learning that the main barrier we face as women in progressing up the ranks within our sector was confidence, I wanted to run a workshop to address this issue and am delighted to be doing so.

Never too late

From my own experience, I understand that confidence, resilience, emotional intelligence and better outer/inner communication are essential life and leadership skills. They enable us to be mentally tough, deal with life’s challenges and are core skills that help reduce the impact of mental health on performance and life fulfilment. We are not taught these at school or university, but the good news is, it’s not too late! We can still learn these vital skills and how to apply them to our daily lives so that we are all much healthier and happier individuals as a result.

Confidence matters

How confident are you really? Has there ever been a time where a lack of confidence has stopped you from going for what you really want? From speaking up? From asking for a pay rise/promotion? From putting yourself forward for opportunities at work or at home?

How do you talk to yourself on a daily basis? Are you very critical of yourself if you make a mistake or can you forgive yourself and seize the opportunity to grow and learn from every slip-up? No matter how confident we think we are, there are always times when a lack of confidence or our biggest fears can hold us back from achieving our true potential. My confidence mini masterclass will help you to address how you see yourself and to appreciate how truly awesome you really are!

Come and take part in Harpreet’s workshop at our Women in Leadership event on 3rd October.

Diabetes: the team approach

By Philip Newland-Jones and Anna Hodgkinson, Consultant Pharmacists in Diabetes

People with diabetes need the support of a full multidisciplinary team more than ever, and utilising pharmacists trained in diabetes care are an essential part of this vision.

Statistics from Diabetes UK show that one person is diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes every three minutes in England and Wales, and 500 people with diabetes die prematurely every week.  It is estimated that the NHS currently spends 10% or £10 billion of its annual budget on diabetes and its complications.

We know that over 65 year olds with Type 2 diabetes have on average six to seven other health concerns, often needing multiple medicines. Both the Long Term Plan and the NHS Interim People Plan recognise the value and impact pharmacists can have to improve outcomes for people living with long term conditions, including diabetes. This paper outlines a clear vision for pharmacy and the need for the NHS to utilise pharmacists alongside other healthcare professionals across all care settings to improve the care of people with Type 2 diabetes.

In the past, pharmacists have held a more traditional but key role in the management of diabetes, including being an integral part of improving medicines safety and supporting medicines optimisation. Over the past few years, recognising the skills and positive impact on care pharmacists can have both with individuals and at a population health level, we have seen a change in mindset. Increased numbers of pharmacists are now working in diabetes and Consultant Pharmacist posts have been developed. Although this is a start, as highly trained and skilled professionals, we know we can do more whether this is at a GP practice, care home, a community pharmacy, hospital, or Integrated Care System level.

The direction of travel for pharmacy in the management of Type 2 diabetes is clear. We have a huge role to play alongside our healthcare professional colleagues in improving outcomes for people with Type 2 diabetes, after all supporting people with diabetes needs the full multidisciplinary team more than ever.

We are excited for the opportunities that the RPS policy document, The Long Term Plan and NHS Interim People Plan will bring for pharmacy and we look forward to working with the profession over the coming days, months and years to promote and support the role of pharmacists within all care settings to improve outcomes for people living with Type 2 diabetes.

It is important to note that pharmacists cannot do this alone, we need the right environment for development, the support and mentoring from colleagues with experience in diabetes care such as practice nurses, diabetes specialist nurses, GP’s, specialist dietitians, podiatrists.  The only way we are going to be able to effectively tackle diabetes across all care sectors is to ensure this seamless teamworking and collaboration is encouraged and cultivated.

We’ve got two things to ask of you:

  • If you are a pharmacist, and you are interested in supporting people with diabetes then please ensure you have thought over what competencies you need to develop using the UKCPA Integrated Career and Competency Framework for pharmacists in Diabetes
  • If you are a healthcare professional working in diabetes in any sector of the NHS, think if your team would benefit from the support of a pharmacist, and if you work with a pharmacist embrace and support their development to ensure they are the best they can be for your team and your patients.

Why Pride matters


By Gareth Kitson, RPS Professional Development and Engagement Lead

I had known for a long time that I was gay but had never had to acknowledge it. I never engaged with the LGBT+ community at Uni as I had a ready-made group of friends. I wasn’t confident enough to engage with members of the community as I felt I had to behave in a certain way.  After moving to London I was pushed into the one of the most vibrant and diverse communities in the world and wasn’t ready for the effect it would have on me.

Fitting in

Every aspect of the LGBT+ community had “tribes” or “communities” and I really struggled to find my place.  I also found it really hard to make friends outside of a dating environment.  Most gay men will tell you the same story – insecurity, isolation and the struggle to “fit in”. 

In July 2012 I was out shopping on Oxford Street and accidentally stumbled on the Pride in London Parade.  I felt overwhelmed, curious and confused as to what was happening.  I stopped and watched the entire Parade pass by and spent the rest of the day reflecting on what I had just seen.

Not alone

For the first time, I suddenly felt that I wasn’t alone.  I suddenly realised that there were other people living in the same city as me who identified as a member of the LGBT+ community.  There were opportunities to meet people who may have gone through the same experiences as you, be it coming to terms with your own identity or coming out to your family and friends. 

This one day showed me that people from all backgrounds can stand next to each other and be proud of who they are.  That families can gather and show their children that it is OK for a man to love a man and that some of their friends may have two mummies instead of a mummy and a daddy. 

It was heart-warming, confidence-boosting and empowering when I finally realised that I wasn’t alone.  That I could live my life as I wanted, being true to who I really was, in the city I now called home. That’s why Pride matters.

Members of staff and members of the RPS will be walking in the Parade on 6th July. If you see us, give us a wave #wearepharmacy.