RPS England responds to review of prescribing of certain products and medicines

Sandra Gidley 3by RPS England Chair Sandra Gidley

The NHS has traditionally provided treatment free at the point of use for both short term and life-long conditions.

Today, reporting shows this is being reconsidered.  This could be interpreted as an attack on this important principle.

Balanced against this view is the need for the NHS to be as cost effective as possible in a term of constrained resources. We understand the need for prioritisation. Read more RPS England responds to review of prescribing of certain products and medicines

Could protected learning time for pharmacists be a reality?

johnathanlaird150Johnathan Laird is a community pharmacist independent prescriber with a special interest in asthma. He is based in Turriff, Aberdeenshire.

As we develop into more clinically focused areas, like independent prescribing and managing lists of patients, protected learning has to become a reality. With this in mind, I was delighted to read about the RPS in Scotland advocating the need for protected learning time in their manifestoRight Medicine – Better Health – Fitter Future. Read more Could protected learning time for pharmacists be a reality?

Prescribing for people with learning disabilities must change

Sandra Gidley 3by Sandra Gidley, Chair, English Pharmacy Board

Early last week three separate reports from the Care Quality Commission, Public Health England and NHS Improving Quality were released and painted a poor and depressing picture of the level of prescribing of antipsychotics and antidepressants in those with learning disabilities.

Following the release of the reports, I co-signed, on behalf of the RPS English Pharmacy Board, a letter from NHS England stating that the scale of the problem was unacceptable and that an emergency summit was being arranged to agree how to tackle the problem. The letter was also signed by the Royal College of Psychiatrists and the Royal College of Nursing. Read more Prescribing for people with learning disabilities must change

Prescribing – Why every GP practice needs a pharmacist

By Neal Patel, Head of Corporate Communications

The General medical Council’s new report on prescribing published today, “Investigating the prevalence and causes of prescribing errors in general practice”, shows that while the vast majority of prescribing by GP’s  is safe and effective, around 1 in 20 prescriptions contain an error. The report makes recommendations of ways in which safety and quality of prescribing could be further improved.

The GMC have said that patients and doctors could also benefit from greater involvement ofrom pharmacists in supporting prescribing and monitoring. We would go further and have   a pharmacist working in the practice with GPs, dedicated to patient safety.

GP’s, like pharmacists, are busy people, the demands of modern healthcare provision mean that it’s almost impossible for any one person be on top of all current thinking around illness, treatment and prevention.

Collaboration is key, but often this can be difficult due to poor communication systems and IT. Read more Prescribing – Why every GP practice needs a pharmacist