Pride: professional is personal

by Gareth Kitson, RPS Professional Development and Engagement Lead

Like everyone, my professional identity is informed by my personal life. Achieving that identity has at times been a struggle and is always a work in progress. It’s something I have learned to take pride in.

As I have progressed through my career, I’ve realised that identifying as a gay man is a bigger part of my identity than I once thought. 

Speaking up

I have had countless conversations with colleagues about what it is like to be a gay man living in London. I’ve spoken about how I have faced prejudice and discrimination because of my sexual identity.  I have highlighted the changes in sexual health provision and how HIV is no longer associated with the falling tombstone of the 1980s. I’ve updated people on how PrEP is transforming the prevention agenda for men who have sex with men.

Being a pharmacist is a huge part of my identity and my sexual identity is too. It often intertwines with other aspects of my personality, including my professional life.  If I feel accepted and safe in my working environment, I’m more creative, better engaged and form stronger working relationships.

Pride

This is why I’m really proud that the RPS is walking in the Pride in London Parade in 2019. 

This is the first time we’ve done something like this.  I’m proud that my professional body recognises both my professional and personal identity. Members of staff and members of RPS will be walking in the Parade on July 6th – if you see us, give us a wave! #wearepharmacy.

Why Pride matters


By Gareth Kitson, RPS Professional Development and Engagement Lead

I had known for a long time that I was gay but had never had to acknowledge it. I never engaged with the LGBT+ community at Uni as I had a ready-made group of friends. I wasn’t confident enough to engage with members of the community as I felt I had to behave in a certain way.  After moving to London I was pushed into the one of the most vibrant and diverse communities in the world and wasn’t ready for the effect it would have on me.

Fitting in

Every aspect of the LGBT+ community had “tribes” or “communities” and I really struggled to find my place.  I also found it really hard to make friends outside of a dating environment.  Most gay men will tell you the same story – insecurity, isolation and the struggle to “fit in”. 

In July 2012 I was out shopping on Oxford Street and accidentally stumbled on the Pride in London Parade.  I felt overwhelmed, curious and confused as to what was happening.  I stopped and watched the entire Parade pass by and spent the rest of the day reflecting on what I had just seen.

Not alone

For the first time, I suddenly felt that I wasn’t alone.  I suddenly realised that there were other people living in the same city as me who identified as a member of the LGBT+ community.  There were opportunities to meet people who may have gone through the same experiences as you, be it coming to terms with your own identity or coming out to your family and friends. 

This one day showed me that people from all backgrounds can stand next to each other and be proud of who they are.  That families can gather and show their children that it is OK for a man to love a man and that some of their friends may have two mummies instead of a mummy and a daddy. 

It was heart-warming, confidence-boosting and empowering when I finally realised that I wasn’t alone.  That I could live my life as I wanted, being true to who I really was, in the city I now called home. That’s why Pride matters.

Members of staff and members of the RPS will be walking in the Parade on 6th July. If you see us, give us a wave #wearepharmacy.

Pride 2017

By Robbie Turner, RPS Director for England

This weekend sees the Pride in London parade taking to the streets of the city with over 300 groups marching to fight for equality of the LGBTQ community.

Having watched the parade many times before I know that it is often seen as a celebration of what the LGBTQ community have achieved over the last five decades since the partial decriminalisation of homosexuality in the UK. I certainly recognise this progress and as a gay man have always felt proud to be a member of a LGBTQ community which is in the main, welcoming, diverse and accepting of others.

But not every LGBTQ person has the positive experience I do and this can have a significant impact on their health. Research by METRO charity shows that 52% of young LGBT people reported self-harm either recently or in the past, compared to 25% of heterosexual non-trans young people. Also, 44% of young LGBT people have considered suicide compared to 26% of heterosexual non-trans people.

To say that 25 years after I came out, young people are still suffering high levels of abuse, discrimination and mental health issues is hugely upsetting. As a pharmacist, I know that there are always competing priorities on our time and resources. But, over this Pride in London weekend, I will be reflecting on what more I can do to help young LGBTQ people and how the Royal Pharmaceutical Society can support pharmacists to do the same.