Pride in Practice : Being brave

by Dr. Claire Thompson, RPS Deputy Chief Scientist

She…

I’ve written lots of blogs on science or leadership but never about being gay, so this is my first professional outing.

I’m fortunate in that I have never experienced overt homophobia in the workplace. This is in stark contrast to my personal life, where experiences have ranged from:

– Being abandoned by groups of friends at school;
– Family members not coming to my wedding because they didn’t “agree with it”; and
– Strangers in the street shouting “You deserve to die” for simply holding hands with my girlfriend. (No, this wasn’t the 1950s, it was 2003)

Even though they haven’t been painful professional experiences, it doesn’t mean there haven’t been uncomfortable ones. Like every time someone asks “What does your husband do?”. I’ve lost count of the number of times I’ve responded “They….” or “My partner….” Because I didn’t want people to feel uncomfortable or embarrassed. But the longer you leave it, the more uncomfortable the discussion gets.

When is the right time?

So, when is the right time to say “She” or “My girlfriend” or “My wife”? Over the last few years, I’ve made a conscious decision to get “She” in early. The birth of my daughter really helped with this. As a proud parent, I would show people photographs and they would say “You look great for having a young baby” to which I could respond “Oh my wife gave birth to her, and she looks better than I do!” (See the photo below as proof). I find that openness, humour and a baby photo go a long way to diffusing any discomfort. Of course, there have been occasions where I have just taken the compliment (please don’t tell my wife)!

Dr. Claire Thompson (right) with her family

Brave

Coming out to colleagues still doesn’t come naturally, it always takes an element of bravery and I do admit that there are some people that I still don’t tell because I know they will judge me unfairly. Ultimately, we need to be comfortable with what we share about ourselves.
But if you do want people in the workplace to know that you are gay, take a deep breath and go for it.
Be brave. Be you.

Pride in Practice

by Sarah Steel MRPharmS, RPS Wales Policy and Practice Co-ordinator

Sarah Steel MRPharmS, Policy and Practice Coordinator

With August being the month we in Wales choose to celebrate Pride, what better time for the RPS Wales team to join the ongoing campaign for unity, equality, acceptance and embracement. To show our solidarity, some of our RPS staff members will be sharing their experiences in pharmacy as members of the LBGT community, and on the 24th of August, the eve of Pride Cymru, in the office we will be donning our brightest colours, eating rainbow cakes and flying the flag in support of Pride.

Why we still need to worry about equality

I’ve found myself thinking recently – if last year marked the 50th anniversary of the 1967 Sexual Offences Act and the “de-criminalisation of homosexuality”, why are members of the LGBT community still being tormented, isolated and discriminated against? It turns out, my ignorance was distorting my understanding. In 1967 homosexuality was in fact only partially de-criminalised; many anti-gay laws remained, and criminalisation did not in fact toally end in the United Kingdom until 2013. That’s only five years ago!

Five years ago, I was in my second year of University. Through my time at University and my career to date, I have been a proud member of the LGBT community. For the majority of the time, I have felt accepted and embraced, but I can’t say I have always felt that I am, or would always be, treated the same. My sexuality is something I am conscious of in interviews, when starting new jobs or working in new teams. I am still, in 2018, worried how people will react when, for example, I correct he to she when talking about my personal life. And I am sad to hear from colleagues and friends that they have had much worse experiences, including homophobic slurs and discrimination.

Join us and show your Pride in Practice

What stands out to me clearly is that LGBT rights and support is not a moot point, and there’s still a long way to go. The celebration of the campaign and the achievements so far is as important as ever, and we hope that through our blogs and  photos, we can be a part of the campaign for unity, equality, acceptance and embracement for all of our members. We’d love it for members to join us by sharing photos of your involvement this weekend, either at home or in the work place. Be sure to tag your social posts with #RPSPrideInPractice so we can share!

A revolution for health and social care in Wales?

by Ross Gregory, Head of External Relations, Royal Pharmaceutical Society in Wales

Ross Gregory, Head of External Relations, RPS Wales
Ross Gregory, Head of External Relations, RPS Wales

If you haven’t already heard of the Parliamentary Review of Health and Social Care in Wales, there is little doubt you soon will. Published early in the New Year and anticipated as one of the most important independent advisory reports for the NHS Wales in nearly two decades, the report makes a case for change for radically transforming the Welsh model of health and social care to make it fit and sustainable for the future.

I would recommend you take a look at the report. At less than 40 pages long, it’s far from an onerous or difficult read and you may find it provides a certain ‘feel good factor’. You may even find it provides a ray of hope that the challenges facing us in the delivery of health and social care services are being thoroughly addressed. Beyond the glow of enthusiasm and optimism however, a number of critical questions remain; Will the report have the potential to drive a revolution from within our system and significantly transform services? What will a new system look and feel like? What will this mean for pharmacy services and the future of pharmacy profession in Wales?

Read more A revolution for health and social care in Wales?

Measles in South Wales – what you need to know

Jodie Williamson MRPharmS, Pharmacist at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society
Jodie Williamson MRPharmS

by Jodie Williamson MRPharmS, Pharmacist at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society

In June 2017 Public Health Wales announced that there were four confirmed cases of Measles in Newport. By July 24 the number of cases confirmed had increased to 10. This outbreak triggered a rolling vaccination programme in the area, with over 1,000 children receiving the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine. This outbreak was caused by the same strain of measles that has affected more than 14,000 people across Europe this year, and has sadly killed 35 people to date.

So what do you need to know about measles to keep you and your family safe?

Measles is a highly infectious viral illness which is passed from person to person via droplets which are released into the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes. The virus can live on surfaces for several hours and you can catch measles just by touching that surface and then placing your hands near your nose and mouth.

The symptoms of measles are:

  • Cold-like symptoms such as sneezing and a high temperature
  • A Cough
  • Sore, red eyes which are sensitive to light
  • Small greyish-white spots on the inside of the cheeks
  • Reddish-brown blotchy rash which usually appears a couple of days after the other symptoms.

If you think that you or your child may have measles you should contact your GP. It is important to call the surgery before you attend so that they can take steps to reduce the risk of other patients becoming infected whilst you’re there. If you or your child has received two doses of the MMR vaccine or previously had measles then it is unlikely to be measles – there are a number of other conditions with similar symptoms.

 

Treating a measles infection

There is no specific treatment for measles, but there are a number of things you can do to ease the symptoms in ordinary cases.

  • Paracetamol can be used to reduce a high temperature and relieve pain.
  • Closing blinds/curtains or dimming lights can help with sensitivity to light.
  • A sore throat or a cough can be soothed with hot drinks, particularly those containing honey and lemon. It is important to note that honey should not be given to babies under 12 months old.
  • Drink plenty of fluids to avoid dehydration.
  • Wash away crustiness around the eyes with damp cotton wool.

Your local pharmacist will be able to advise you on the best treatment for your symptoms. They will also make sure that any medicines you buy over the counter are safe to take with your regular medication if you take any.

 

More serious cases of measles

Measles usually lasts for 7-10 days and although it is often unpleasant, most cases pass without any additional complications. However, some people can develop serious, and even life-threatening illnesses such as pneumonia and meningitis. Other life-changing complications can include blindness and deafness. Serious complications are more likely to develop in children under 5, children with a poor diet and people with a weakened immune system.

Warning signs of serious complications from measles to look out for include:

  • Shortness of breath
  • Sharp chest pain that is worse when breathing in
  • Coughing up blood
  • Drowsiness
  • Confusion
  • Convulsions (fits)

If you or your child develops any of these symptoms you should go to your nearest accident and emergency (A&E) department or dial 999 for an ambulance.

 

Stop your family from being affected in the first place

The best thing you can do to protect you and your family from measles if make sure that you have all had two doses of the MMR vaccine. The first dose is usually given to babies when they are between 12 and 13 months old, and the second dose is given at 3 years and 4 months, but it is never too late to get vaccinated. If you’re not sure if you have received the vaccine, contact your GP surgery who will be able to check your records.

Yellow is the new black

Susan Huey 150x150Susan Huey, Clinical Pharmacist, Pre-registration Tutor and Yellow Card Champion for Cardiff and Vale University Health Board

Have you completed a yellow card? Are you encouraging your patients to report any adverse side effects to any medicines they are taking? All of us can do our part to help ensure healthcare products are acceptably safe for patients. Read more Yellow is the new black

Being a board member – what I have learned so far

Paul Harris 150x150By Paul Harris, Welsh Pharmacy Board member and Wales External Relationships Lead for Boots UK

In June 2014, I was elected to the Welsh Pharmacy Board of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS). One year on, I feel confident in my role but I remember well how I felt during the first weeks of my appointment Read more Being a board member – what I have learned so far

Developing a research strategy for Wales

Sarah Hiom 150x150
Dr Sarah Hiom, MPharmS, PhD, All Wales Specialist Pharmacist, R & D, Cardiff and Vale University Health Board

A core message coming from our professional leaders is that ‘research is everybody’s business.’ A Research and Evaluation cluster is now included in the Advanced Pharmacy Framework of the RPS Faculty. Increasingly, the commissioning of NHS services is being based on patient outcomes so the need to provide evidence to support our current or future services is essential. Read more Developing a research strategy for Wales

Faculty Action Learning Sets – getting by with a little help from our friends

Rob Davies150x150
By Rob Davies, MFRPSII MRPharmS, Primary Care Pharmacist BCUHB, Board Member RPS Wales, Faculty Champion

As I was writing this blog, I was reminded of a line from one of my favourite Beatles songs: “With a little help from my friends”. For me, this encapsulates the essence of an RPS Faculty Action Learning Set: to be helped on your Faculty journey and help others on theirs. Read more Faculty Action Learning Sets – getting by with a little help from our friends

Develop your staff through the Faculty

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By Sudhir Sehrawat, Director & Superintendent Pharmacist, Insync Healthcare Pharmacy, Cardiff South Wales, Cardiff and Vale LPF Lead

As we near the end of 2014, I am fortunate to have been nominated LPF Lead for Cardiff and Vale Local Practice Forum. For me, this post is full of excitement, opportunities and challenges. Cardiff and Vale LPF have an enthusiastic steering group and committed members. As we head into 2015 we are tasked with growing the membership – a challenge for all LPFs! Read more Develop your staff through the Faculty

Why all practising pharmacists should be involved in research

davidmcrae150x150By David McRae, Clinical Trials Pharmacist, Cwm Taf University Health Board, Prince Charles Hospital, Merthyr Tydfil

When I was asked to blog about pharmacy practice research and evaluation here in Wales, I gleefully seized upon the opportunity. It was a certain type of glee – the type of happiness you experience when you turn over an exam paper to find a twenty mark question on the topic you revised only last night. The recent RPS Annual Conference has focused many of our minds on research and why it is so necessary. Read more Why all practising pharmacists should be involved in research