Creating a profession where you feel comfortable to be yourselves

by Robbie Turner, RPS Director for England

Recently I wrote a blog about  LGBTQ Pride celebrations describing how upset I was that LGBTQ young people were still suffering high levels of abuse, discrimination and mental health issues as a result of their identity. I promised to reflect on what more the RPS could do to support pharmacists to help young LGBTQ people and we are exploring how our future RPS campaigns can deliver this. Read more Creating a profession where you feel comfortable to be yourselves

My week at RPS

Roshnee Patel, MPharms Student at King’s College London

What’s happening behind the scenes? As a pharmacy student it is very difficult to understand and know what is being done for us outside the four walls of our university. My week at RPS demonstrated to me how much support there is available after we graduate but also during our studies. Fortunately, I was able to spend some time within the marketing team and I got to see it all.

From just about knowing how to use Google calendar to now being able to structure, format and schedule social media posts, my time at RPS has enabled me to develop a wide range of my skill sets. In the RPS, opportunities are always knocking on your door. I was given the opportunity to write an email to students in Birmingham. Having had no previous experience in writing emails to such a large number of recipients, I was taught the do’s and don’ts and how to template my email. Within the marketing team, I also got to witness the amount of hard work which goes into planning and preparing for anything to be sent out to the public and making sure that whatever is being sent out is for the correct audience with the most useful information. Before anything is sent to the public it is prepared and checked way in advance. The FIP World Congress next year is being held in Glasgow and is being hosted by the RPS. Even though the event is over a year away, a tremendous amount of work is currently being done to make sure the event is the best. Having also got the chance to sit in on a meeting, I saw how the RPS have and are still developing programmes to help pharmacy students from their first day till their last and beyond that as well. When we’ve just finished our pre-reg year or we’re over 10 years into our career it is comforting to know that the RPS will be there to support and guide us if we need them. It was also great to see how the RPS are always highlighting the importance of pharmacists in the community and are continuously changing themselves to make our journeys easier.

Read more My week at RPS

Research is everyone’s business

By Sonia Garner, Research Support Manager, RPS

Research is a young person’s game, an academic career pathway, something that doesn’t apply to me – to me, a middle-aged pharmacy professional with a background in community pharmacy support.  So it was with some trepidation that I found myself booked into the NHS Research and Development (R&D) Forum Conference in Manchester, May 15-16 2017: not only booked in as a delegate but with a poster presentation and an RPS stand to man.  So how did this come about?

Ten months ago I was appointed to cover a maternity leave position at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS) as a Research Support Manager with responsibility for the Research Ready accreditation scheme for community pharmacy. Read more Research is everyone’s business

How pharmacy can raise public awareness of health issues

by Tricia Armstrong

Community pharmacists have historically been the most accessible healthcare professionals and have successfully taken part in many public health campaigns, such as stop smoking services. In recent years the role of the pharmacist has become more diverse with pharmacists offering more services, such as flu vaccinations. Patients are looking for convenience and accessibility and pharmacists often meet these needs by providing services in the evenings and at weekends. In an article by Anderson and Thornley (2012), the authors discuss the reasons why patients, who are entitled to free NHS flu vaccinations, are prepared to pay for vaccinations because the service is more easily accessible in pharmacies. Read more How pharmacy can raise public awareness of health issues

Royal Pharmaceutical Society appoints new Chief Executive

cropped-RPS_primarystacked_RGB.jpgPharmacist Paul Bennett has been appointed as the new Chief Executive of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society. Paul will take up his post at the beginning of July 2017.

Paul joins the RPS from his position as Chief Officer of the Hampshire and Isle of Wight Local Pharmaceutical Committee.  Prior to this, Paul was Professional Standards Director and Superintendent Pharmacist at Boots UK and brings a wealth of professional and commercial experience gained from both national and local pharmacy organisations alongside strong leadership credentials from business and from close working with NHS Commissioners of service and others. Read more Royal Pharmaceutical Society appoints new Chief Executive

RPS England responds to review of prescribing of certain products and medicines

Sandra Gidley 3by RPS England Chair Sandra Gidley

The NHS has traditionally provided treatment free at the point of use for both short term and life-long conditions.

Today, reporting shows this is being reconsidered.  This could be interpreted as an attack on this important principle.

Balanced against this view is the need for the NHS to be as cost effective as possible in a term of constrained resources. We understand the need for prioritisation. Read more RPS England responds to review of prescribing of certain products and medicines

How to get an NIHR research fellowship

Mandy WanBy Mandy Wan, Lead Paediatric Clinical Trials Pharmacist at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust and HEE/ NIHR Doctoral Research Fellow

I was delighted to hear just before Christmas that I was successful with an NIHR fellowship application and want to encourage more pharmacists to apply for funding and to lead research.

I have been a paediatric clinical trials pharmacist for most of the past 10 years, so am lucky to already be closely engaged in research work and have an understanding of how research can really impact day to day practice.
I applied for NIHR funding 2 years ago but I wasn’t successful. This time, I decided to apply again with a different topic. My research question came from a common query that kept coming through to the pharmacy department; what dose of Vitamin D is appropriate in children? Read more How to get an NIHR research fellowship

Faculty eight week fast track plan – Week one: Identify peers

faculty-eight-week-blogby Amareen Kamboh MRPharmS PGDipGPP PGCertClinEd FHEA – Senior Teaching Fellow, and programme lead for the JPB postgraduate diploma at the Centre for Inter-Professional Postgraduate Education and Training (CIPPET) at the University of Reading. Education and Training Lead Pharmacist, Educational Programme Director for pre-registration pharmacists at Hampshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.

I began the Faculty Fast Track by familiarising myself with the resources on Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS) website that were associated with the peer review, I wrote a down a list of peers that I could contact to assist with the peer review process. Peer review is valuable in supporting the Faculty assessment, and also is a useful validation and quality control to support professional development. The RPS Faculty pages recommend identifying 15 to 20 individuals from a variety of different roles and experience. I chose a range of peers that I have worked with in both academia and secondary care. From this list I identified those who I had mentored and tutored, members of the multidisciplinary team and senior team members and line managers. As well as identifying peers in my current organisation and university role I also contacted team members from the previous trust that I worked for where I first started as an education and training lead. Alongside this, I also felt it was important to obtain feedback from fellow education and training leads from neighbouring trusts, who I work alongside for regional roles in order to capture feedback fully, identify areas for development and evaluate my current working practice. Read more Faculty eight week fast track plan – Week one: Identify peers

Faculty eight week fast track plan – my experience

faculty-eight-week-blogAmareen Kamboh MRPharmS PGDipGPP PGCertClinEd FHEA – Senior Teaching Fellow, and programme lead for the JPB postgraduate diploma at the Centre for Inter-Professional Postgraduate Education and Training (CIPPET) at the University of Reading. Education and Training Lead Pharmacist, Educational Programme Director for pre-registration pharmacists at Hampshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.

Contemplation
For a while I have been contemplating starting my Faculty application for professional recognition of advance practice to validate my experience post-registration as an education and training lead pharmacist. Once my development has been recognised post-nominals will be granted that signify my stage in practice. This provides a means of demonstrating to patients, the public and my employer, that I have achieved a designated level, thus providing evidence of capability as a professional.

Read more Faculty eight week fast track plan – my experience

Community Innovators – Jay Badenhorst

Jay 150Part of our series on Inspirational Community Innovators

Jay Badenhorst is a community pharmacist that started his career in South Africa. He moved to the UK in 2001 and soon after that decided to stay permanently. He is passionate about pharmacy and the potential that community pharmacy can play in the health and wellbeing of patients.

He once said “In order to be a great leader you don’t need an official title. Whether you’re a pharmacy manager, assistant or technician, you can achieve great things.” He believes that it takes a multifaceted approach to ensuring patients’ best interests are always kept at heart in community pharmacy. Every team members brings a valuable contribution to ensuring every contact counts. He believes it is up to employers to ensure that the professional development of all team members in the pharmacy is ongoing, including investing time into the development of newly qualified pharmacists. Read more Community Innovators – Jay Badenhorst