Palliative and End of Life Care – why getting it right is so important

Dr. Idris Baker, National Clinical Lead for Palliative and End of Life Care in Wales
Dr. Idris Baker, National Clinical Lead for Palliative and End of Life Care in Wales

by Dr. Idris Baker, National Clinical Lead for Palliative and End of Life Care in Wales

Are you serious?

 

“Are you serious about this? Who do you think you are?” the out of hours coordinator asked me. “Sending a man like this home? Asking for morphine for him to go with? A man like this needs to be in hospital.”

The problem was that Bill – he wasn’t “a man like this”, he was this man– didn’t want to be in hospital. He was in A&E, and he was screaming, and he could only tell me two things: he wanted painkillers, and he wanted to go home. He only had these two wishes and he hoped I could grant him both.

 

Bill’s story

 

His family filled in some blanks. Bill had advanced pancreatic cancer, his chemotherapy hadn’t worked, and he knew – they all knew – that he was dying. No one had given him any decent painkillers. It had got so bad that they had to bring him to hospital. We had old hospital notes and it all checked out, so there was nothing suspicious about the story. Bill was dying, in pain, and scared. I was scared too, a new young casualty officer facing a long bank holiday weekend, and I didn’t know much but even I could grasp a bit about Bill’s situation.

Read more Palliative and End of Life Care – why getting it right is so important

Pride in Practice : Being brave

by Dr. Claire Thompson, RPS Deputy Chief Scientist

She…

I’ve written lots of blogs on science or leadership but never about being gay, so this is my first professional outing.

I’m fortunate in that I have never experienced overt homophobia in the workplace. This is in stark contrast to my personal life, where experiences have ranged from:

– Being abandoned by groups of friends at school;
– Family members not coming to my wedding because they didn’t “agree with it”; and
– Strangers in the street shouting “You deserve to die” for simply holding hands with my girlfriend. (No, this wasn’t the 1950s, it was 2003)

Even though they haven’t been painful professional experiences, it doesn’t mean there haven’t been uncomfortable ones. Like every time someone asks “What does your husband do?”. I’ve lost count of the number of times I’ve responded “They….” or “My partner….” Because I didn’t want people to feel uncomfortable or embarrassed. But the longer you leave it, the more uncomfortable the discussion gets.

When is the right time?

So, when is the right time to say “She” or “My girlfriend” or “My wife”? Over the last few years, I’ve made a conscious decision to get “She” in early. The birth of my daughter really helped with this. As a proud parent, I would show people photographs and they would say “You look great for having a young baby” to which I could respond “Oh my wife gave birth to her, and she looks better than I do!” (See the photo below as proof). I find that openness, humour and a baby photo go a long way to diffusing any discomfort. Of course, there have been occasions where I have just taken the compliment (please don’t tell my wife)!

Dr. Claire Thompson (right) with her family

Brave

Coming out to colleagues still doesn’t come naturally, it always takes an element of bravery and I do admit that there are some people that I still don’t tell because I know they will judge me unfairly. Ultimately, we need to be comfortable with what we share about ourselves.
But if you do want people in the workplace to know that you are gay, take a deep breath and go for it.
Be brave. Be you.

Our new policy manifesto for Wales

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By Suzanne Scott-Thomas, Chair, Welsh Pharmacy Board

In May 2016 people in Wales will cast their votes in the elections to the National Assembly.  Engaging with politicians in the run up to the election is vitally important in helping us secure a better future for patients and the pharmacy profession in Wales.

That’s why we’ve launched our policy vision for Wales, Steps to better health and wellbeing to help shape the manifestos of the political parties.  It highlights the importance of maximising the pharmacy workforce and using clinical pharmacy skills to help address the current and future demands on NHS services. Read more Our new policy manifesto for Wales