Palliative and End of Life Care – getting it right first time

Sudhir Sehrawat, Community Pharmacist and RPS Welsh Pharmacy Board member
Sudhir Sehrawat, Community Pharmacist and RPS Welsh Pharmacy Board member

by Sudhir Sehrawat, Community Pharmacist and RPS Welsh Pharmacy Board member.

 

Getting it right – first time.

 

In every day working life we strive to get things right so we achieve the results that people need. It saves time, avoids duplication of effort and you get the result you want. Yet, as a community pharmacist, I see palliative care as an area where we sometimes don’t get things right first time due to the complexity of the systems and processes involved.

 

What happens when we get it wrong

 

In a real life scenario I was presented with a prescription by a patient’s relative for end of life medication on a Saturday morning. The medication prescribed was not on the Health Board Palliative Care Formulary and the family had spent most of the previous day travelling to various community pharmacies to get the prescription dispensed. I contacted the out-of-hours GP explaining the situation and the relative was asked to attend the out-of-hours service for a new prescription. They returned after lunch with a new prescription, however, the hand written prescription did not meet the controlled drugs regulations. I contacted the out-of-hours service again and the family member was asked to pick up a new prescription and return to the pharmacy. The controlled drug was supplied in part due to limited stock held but was enough to last until Monday evening. I explained we could order the remaining stock and deliver it when it arrived. After work on Monday evening I visited the patient’s address with the remaining medication only to discover the patient had sadly, already passed away on Saturday evening.

When a patient is at end of life members of the family and friends need to be with their loved ones, not chasing supplies of medication.

There’s lots to consider within this one real life scenario.

  • Why was a non-formulary palliative care medication prescribed?
  • Why was the alternative controlled drug prescription not written correctly?
  • Where were the communication channels to let the community pharmacy know the patient had passed away?

This single case is typical and highlights multiple opportunities to improve care at the end of life.

 

Getting it right in future

 

I welcome the upcoming policy on palliative and end of life care by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society in Wales. This leading policy will address the issues we healthcare professionals face and importantly, allows patients high quality coordinated care. Patients and carers have the right to be treated with dignity and respect. The policy outlines key areas to ensure patient empowerment through timely access to medication, providing the right support through shared health care plans and offering education and training to the workforce.

If we work on an All Wales approach and implement the key recommendations of the policy, we have the opportunity to drive quality improvements as well as reduce demands on our health and social care services. I’m fully behind the policy as I hope many of you reading this blog will be. Lets get it right – first time.

 

RPS new Palliative and End of Life Care policy for Wales will be published at the end of November, and launched at the RPS Medicines Safety Conference in Cardiff on November 22. 

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