Share your pharmacy story with RPS Wales

Jodie Williamson MRPharmS, Pharmacist at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society
Jodie Williamson MRPharmS, Pharmacist at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society

by Jodie Williamson, Pharmacist and Professional Development and Engagement Lead at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society in Wales

Every member of the pharmacy team has a story, and here at RPS Wales we want to hear yours. We collect the stories of our members and their colleagues here in Wales, and we want to share them more widely in words, images and videos, to help shine a light on the world of pharmacy & showcase the amazing work that’s being done by pharmacy teams right across Wales on a daily basis.

Stories are really powerful, and hearing a story or gaining an insight into someone’s daily life tells people considering pharmacy as a career, along with other healthcare professionals and members of the public, what we do and how we help more than facts and figures can.

Read more Share your pharmacy story with RPS Wales

Meeting rooms for hire at the RPS Office in Cardiff

Our facilities

The Welsh Office of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society, situated in Cardiff Gate Business Park in Pontprennau, has two rooms available for hire, with video conferencing facilities. We can also arrange catering for your event.

Our premises are situated in an ideal location for all your business meetings, just off the M4, a short drive from the city centre and close to bus,  rail and airport links. There is on-site parking at this venue.

View our brochure »


Rooms

Our large, purpose built meeting room – The Turner Room – is suitable for between 20 to 60 people, depending on how the room is set up.
The Rawlings Room, which is our smaller meeting room, comfortably accommodates either 12 people in a boardroom style setup, or 35 people theatre style.

Facilities in these rooms include conference call equipment, projector and screen, flip-chart, laptop and video conference facilities.


Prices*

Rawlings Room (up to 35 people) £20 per hour, discounted half/full day rate available
Turner Room (up to 60 people) £40 per hour, discounted half/full day rate available

*Prices are indicative. Catering available at additional cost. Please contact us for a full quote.

Gallery

The Turner Room is the larger of the two rooms available for hire at the RPS Wales Office in Cardiff.


Find us


Get in touch for a quote (or pop by for a tour!)

Tel: 029 2073 0310
Email: wales@rpharms.com
Unit 2, Ashtree Court
Woodsy Close
Cardiff Gate Business Park
Cardiff
CF23 8RW

Supporting you locally: A look at the year ahead

Jodie Williamson MRPharmS, Pharmacist at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society
Jodie Williamson MRPharmS, Pharmacist at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society

by Jodie Williamson, Pharmacist and Professional Development and Engagement Lead at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society in Wales.

We’ve had a busy year rolling out our RPS Wales local engagement model, bringing pharmacists together with our new local coordinators  to make sure we’re delivering the best support and networking opportunities for our members in Wales. Read on to find out more about our plans to support members locally, particularly how we’re going to helping everyone in Wales be Revalidation Ready!

 

Read more Supporting you locally: A look at the year ahead

Influencing policy and advocating for pharmacy in Wales

Elen Jones, Practice and Policy Lead, RPS Wales
Elen Jones, Practice and Policy Lead, RPS Wales

by Elen Jones, Practice and Policy Lead at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society in Wales.

We’ve had a busy year working with colleagues in NHS Wales and Welsh Government to put pharmacy at the heart of future healthcare planning in Wales, as well as working on policies to improve patient outcomes.

 

Read more Influencing policy and advocating for pharmacy in Wales

Pre reg revision course – my experience

Michelle, previous pre reg revision course attendee

by Michelle Clothier, Relief Pharmacist – Boots

When I first saw the advertisement for the RPS pre reg revision course event I was in two minds whether to go along. Half of me thought about the price and that it was far for me to travel, and the other half told me that it would be a good idea to go just to see how the exam would be laid out and get an experience of a pre-registration exam. Then a mock day came up in the city of Newcastle (close to my home) and I just knew that I had to go.

Day 1

I was really nervous the first day, particularly because I didn’t know many people there and partly because I knew my calculations were weak and I didn’t want people to notice my weakness. However, after the first day I quickly realised that I was not the only person worried about calculations and it gave me a glimmer of hope.

I arrived early and everyone was in good spirits, the check in process was quick and simple and I got my name badge and entered the hall. I sat on a table with only one other person I knew and we started working through the workbook provided. We were given the GPhC framework for the exam and lots of important learning materials including a list of the high risk drugs and everything you could ever need to know about them. Lunch was provided on both days (which was lovely and catered for everyone), and tea and coffee was flowing for everyone throughout the day. The main thing I learned on the first day was how to go about a number of calculations and I used the method I had written down to practice everyday until the exam. This is why the first day is so good! Methods are explained in detail and you are given time to write everything down so that you can use all of your notes for revision!

Day 2

This was the actual mock exam. I was tired (you don’t sleep much before the actual exam so this was perfect) and I was nervous despite it being a mock. It was clearly explained how the day was going to run and it was actually a perfect representation of how the actual exam did run. I didn’t pass the exam, but it gave me hope because I was quite close to the pass mark of 70%. As we marked our own paper I made a list of the points of which I got wrong so I could start to build my revision around them. You didn’t have to tell anyone the mark you achieved unless you wanted to.

Building up to the (real) assessment

After those two days, I used the framework given by the RPS and the points I had made to really start revising, and, despite failing the mock I passed the real thing!

I would highly recommend this mock to all pre-registration pharmacists. It is well worth the money because it is the foundation required to begin revision, it is an opportunity to mingle with other pre-regs who are all feeling as nervous as you are and you make new friends – all of who will be there with you and for you in your career in pharmacy. Don’t forget, no question is a stupid question – it is guaranteed that someone else in that room is wondering the same thing as you are.

The professionals from the RPS are there to share their knowledge and experience, ask your questions and learn as much as you can, take the resources and pass your exam. It sounds simple and perhaps cliche, but you get out what you put in and the RPS mock exam is the perfect opportunity to put in effort and get out knowledge and experience.

Honestly well worth it!

Visit the pre-reg revision courses events page to book your place today.

 

 

Winter Wellness

Jodie Williamson MRPharmS, Pharmacist at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society
Jodie Williamson MRPharmS

by Jodie Williamson, Pharmacist and Professional Development and Engagement Lead at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society in Wales.

We often hear about the pressures facing the NHS during the winter months but did you know that there are steps that we can all take to stay well this Winter that can help to relieve this pressure?

Read more Winter Wellness

Grant application success!

Kristina Medlinskiene, previous course attendee

Writing a grant application for the first time is not easy to say the least (or maybe it never gets easy). I recall my very early start on this endeavour with very rough knowledge of what it may entail. The RPS two-day research proposal workshop gave me clarity but it also raised many more questions about issues I hadn’t even thought about!

Patient public involvement group? Advisory group? Before the workshop I had not thought about forming these groups or had any idea how to do it. Methodology? Theoretical framework? Detailed costs of the project? Just a few things that I needed to find answers to.

The format of the two days stimulated thinking about your project and the grant application. Most importantly it gave me a direction, a sense of ‘right, this is clearer now’. By the end of the two days I had a preliminary action plan with identified crucial tasks that I needed to address first.

The two days consisted of presentations and workshops covering various topics from how to build a case for the funding application, to the data processing and analysis. Whilst some topics were covered briefly, I read more about it in the book provided and referred back to it for some quick pointers.

Personally, the biggest benefit of attending the two-day workshop alongside the workshops was networking. You not only get a chance to meet and hear experiences of pharmacists who have gone through the process but also ask them for advice later when you are writing your application and get stuck! They were incredibly helpful.

As I have learnt writing a grant application requires a lot of commitment, persistence and some sleepless nights. Get all the help you can, even if it means pushing barriers of your confidence!

If you don’t know how to start writing an application, these workshops could be what you need. They helped me with my application writing.

The RPS will be running a research proposal writing workshop on the 6-7th March 2018. See our events page for more information and to book your place. This course has very limited numbers so please don’t hesitate and secure yours now. We want to ensure you get the grant funding you deserve by writing a successful grant application.

Protect yourself from flu this winter

Jodie Williamson MRPharmS, Pharmacist at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society
Jodie Williamson MRPharmS

by Jodie Williamson, Pharmacist and Professional Development and Engagement Lead at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society in Wales.

In September 2017, the NHS announced that it was preparing for the worst flu season it has ever seen. This is likely to be caused by a heavy flu season, which has been predicted in the wake of more cases of flu than usual detected during the southern hemisphere winter, and a lack of hospital beds. With that in mind, it’s time to think about what you can do to protect yourself. Read more Protect yourself from flu this winter

Pharmagraphics

By Briony Hudson, Pharmacy historian, curator and lecturer

What do mandrake, medicinal treacle and the RPS headquarters have in common?

They all feature in Pharmagraphics , a new online “digital story” from the Wellcome Collection that explores the relationship between pharmacy and design across time.

I started work on the project with Julia Nurse, Wellcome Library’s Collections Researcher, earlier this year to produce six “chapters” that looked at different aspects of pharmacy history and how graphics, design and imagery played their part.  The aim was to link with the Wellcome Collection’s current exhibition ‘Can Graphic Design Save Your Life?’, and to draw on the fantastic collection of images both within Wellcome’s own collection and elsewhere including the Royal Pharmaceutical Society Museum . Read more Pharmagraphics

Why is handwashing important?

By Professor Ash Soni, President of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society

Every day we carry millions of bacteria, some of which are naturally found on our bodies and some of which are germs that can make us ill or infect others.

Every day we have contact with people who don’t always wash their hands after going to the toilet, or preparing food.

Our survey on handwashing shows 84% of British adults don’t wash their hands for long enough to clean them of bacteria which can cause infections such as upset stomachs or pneumonia, or viruses which can cause colds and flu.

Regular handwashing with soap and water is the single best way to protect yourself and others from infections. The recommended time to spend washing your hands is 20 seconds, as long as it takes to sing ‘Happy Birthday to you’ twice. Read more Why is handwashing important?