Pre reg revision course – my experience

Michelle, previous pre reg revision course attendee

by Michelle Clothier, Relief Pharmacist – Boots

When I first saw the advertisement for the RPS pre reg revision course event I was in two minds whether to go along. Half of me thought about the price and that it was far for me to travel, and the other half told me that it would be a good idea to go just to see how the exam would be laid out and get an experience of a pre-registration exam. Then a mock day came up in the city of Newcastle (close to my home) and I just knew that I had to go.

Day 1

I was really nervous the first day, particularly because I didn’t know many people there and partly because I knew my calculations were weak and I didn’t want people to notice my weakness. However, after the first day I quickly realised that I was not the only person worried about calculations and it gave me a glimmer of hope.

I arrived early and everyone was in good spirits, the check in process was quick and simple and I got my name badge and entered the hall. I sat on a table with only one other person I knew and we started working through the workbook provided. We were given the GPhC framework for the exam and lots of important learning materials including a list of the high risk drugs and everything you could ever need to know about them. Lunch was provided on both days (which was lovely and catered for everyone), and tea and coffee was flowing for everyone throughout the day. The main thing I learned on the first day was how to go about a number of calculations and I used the method I had written down to practice everyday until the exam. This is why the first day is so good! Methods are explained in detail and you are given time to write everything down so that you can use all of your notes for revision!

Day 2

This was the actual mock exam. I was tired (you don’t sleep much before the actual exam so this was perfect) and I was nervous despite it being a mock. It was clearly explained how the day was going to run and it was actually a perfect representation of how the actual exam did run. I didn’t pass the exam, but it gave me hope because I was quite close to the pass mark of 70%. As we marked our own paper I made a list of the points of which I got wrong so I could start to build my revision around them. You didn’t have to tell anyone the mark you achieved unless you wanted to.

Building up to the (real) assessment

After those two days, I used the framework given by the RPS and the points I had made to really start revising, and, despite failing the mock I passed the real thing!

I would highly recommend this mock to all pre-registration pharmacists. It is well worth the money because it is the foundation required to begin revision, it is an opportunity to mingle with other pre-regs who are all feeling as nervous as you are and you make new friends – all of who will be there with you and for you in your career in pharmacy. Don’t forget, no question is a stupid question – it is guaranteed that someone else in that room is wondering the same thing as you are.

The professionals from the RPS are there to share their knowledge and experience, ask your questions and learn as much as you can, take the resources and pass your exam. It sounds simple and perhaps cliche, but you get out what you put in and the RPS mock exam is the perfect opportunity to put in effort and get out knowledge and experience.

Honestly well worth it!

Visit the pre-reg revision courses events page to book your place today.

 

 

Winter Wellness

Jodie Williamson MRPharmS, Pharmacist at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society
Jodie Williamson MRPharmS

by Jodie Williamson, Pharmacist and Professional Development and Engagement Lead at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society in Wales.

We often hear about the pressures facing the NHS during the winter months but did you know that there are steps that we can all take to stay well this Winter that can help to relieve this pressure?

Read more Winter Wellness

Grant application success!

Kristina Medlinskiene, previous course attendee

Writing a grant application for the first time is not easy to say the least (or maybe it never gets easy). I recall my very early start on this endeavour with very rough knowledge of what it may entail. The RPS two-day research proposal workshop gave me clarity but it also raised many more questions about issues I hadn’t even thought about!

Patient public involvement group? Advisory group? Before the workshop I had not thought about forming these groups or had any idea how to do it. Methodology? Theoretical framework? Detailed costs of the project? Just a few things that I needed to find answers to.

The format of the two days stimulated thinking about your project and the grant application. Most importantly it gave me a direction, a sense of ‘right, this is clearer now’. By the end of the two days I had a preliminary action plan with identified crucial tasks that I needed to address first.

The two days consisted of presentations and workshops covering various topics from how to build a case for the funding application, to the data processing and analysis. Whilst some topics were covered briefly, I read more about it in the book provided and referred back to it for some quick pointers.

Personally, the biggest benefit of attending the two-day workshop alongside the workshops was networking. You not only get a chance to meet and hear experiences of pharmacists who have gone through the process but also ask them for advice later when you are writing your application and get stuck! They were incredibly helpful.

As I have learnt writing a grant application requires a lot of commitment, persistence and some sleepless nights. Get all the help you can, even if it means pushing barriers of your confidence!

If you don’t know how to start writing an application, these workshops could be what you need. They helped me with my application writing.

The RPS will be running a research proposal writing workshop on the 6-7th March 2018. See our events page for more information and to book your place. This course has very limited numbers so please don’t hesitate and secure yours now. We want to ensure you get the grant funding you deserve by writing a successful grant application.

Protect yourself from flu this winter

Jodie Williamson MRPharmS, Pharmacist at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society
Jodie Williamson MRPharmS

by Jodie Williamson, Pharmacist and Professional Development and Engagement Lead at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society in Wales.

In September 2017, the NHS announced that it was preparing for the worst flu season it has ever seen. This is likely to be caused by a heavy flu season, which has been predicted in the wake of more cases of flu than usual detected during the southern hemisphere winter, and a lack of hospital beds. With that in mind, it’s time to think about what you can do to protect yourself. Read more Protect yourself from flu this winter

Pharmagraphics

By Briony Hudson, Pharmacy historian, curator and lecturer

What do mandrake, medicinal treacle and the RPS headquarters have in common?

They all feature in Pharmagraphics , a new online “digital story” from the Wellcome Collection that explores the relationship between pharmacy and design across time.

I started work on the project with Julia Nurse, Wellcome Library’s Collections Researcher, earlier this year to produce six “chapters” that looked at different aspects of pharmacy history and how graphics, design and imagery played their part.  The aim was to link with the Wellcome Collection’s current exhibition ‘Can Graphic Design Save Your Life?’, and to draw on the fantastic collection of images both within Wellcome’s own collection and elsewhere including the Royal Pharmaceutical Society Museum . Read more Pharmagraphics

Why is handwashing important?

By Professor Ash Soni, President of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society

Every day we carry millions of bacteria, some of which are naturally found on our bodies and some of which are germs that can make us ill or infect others.

Every day we have contact with people who don’t always wash their hands after going to the toilet, or preparing food.

Our survey on handwashing shows 84% of British adults don’t wash their hands for long enough to clean them of bacteria which can cause infections such as upset stomachs or pneumonia, or viruses which can cause colds and flu.

Regular handwashing with soap and water is the single best way to protect yourself and others from infections. The recommended time to spend washing your hands is 20 seconds, as long as it takes to sing ‘Happy Birthday to you’ twice. Read more Why is handwashing important?

Creating a profession where you feel comfortable to be yourselves

by Robbie Turner, RPS Director for England

Recently I wrote a blog about  LGBTQ Pride celebrations describing how upset I was that LGBTQ young people were still suffering high levels of abuse, discrimination and mental health issues as a result of their identity. I promised to reflect on what more the RPS could do to support pharmacists to help young LGBTQ people and we are exploring how our future RPS campaigns can deliver this. Read more Creating a profession where you feel comfortable to be yourselves

What do pharmacists need to know about heartburn?

By Dr Pulak Sahay, Consultant Gastroenterologist and Senior Lecturer of Medicine, Leeds University

What is reflux?

It is estimated that there are over 10 million adults in the UK who suffer from heartburn (sometimes known as reflux disease or Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux Disease (GORD)).  If left untreated or poorly controlled, this can cause considerable discomfort and lead to a poor quality of life. In extreme situations, untreated heartburn can cause a host of both gastrointestinal (GI) and non-GI complications, including severe complications such as Oesophageal Adenocarcinoma (OA) – known as Oesophageal Cancer. Read more What do pharmacists need to know about heartburn?

Pharmacy’s future is digital

By Sibby Buckle, Chair of the RPS Digital Forum

 

What is the RPS Pharmacy Digital Forum?

It’s where the profession comes together to forge the future.  We are an enthusiastic and committed group of 30+ members who agree that digital literacy across the profession needs urgent attention.

With representation from across the UK, and from all sectors of pharmacy – community, primary care and hospital, PMR suppliers, NHS Digital, DH, PSNC, PRSB, and NHS Improvement –  there is a real appetite to create the change needed to enable pharmacy to be truly integrated into the NHS and healthcare. Read more Pharmacy’s future is digital

Write a winning abstract for conferences

Poster display

Write a winning abstract and submit for our inaugural Winter Summit.

Want to hear about the latest innovations in medicines and pharmacy? Looking to get your M.Pharm project published in an international journal? Interested in a career in academia or pharmaceutical science?

Explore the latest innovations in pharmaceutical science and research and get your work published. Join us for the RPS Winter Summit!

 

A new event in the RPS calendar, the Winter Summit will bring together experts from within pharmacy and pharmaceutical science for a programme of cutting edge topics: big data, drug development and the future of education to name a few.

Submit an abstract

Abstract submissions for oral or poster presentation are welcomed from across the science and research spectrum, so whether you have been working in the lab or on a patient-facing project, we have an opportunity for you.

  • Pharmaceutical science and early stage clinical research will be published in the Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology (Impact Factor 2.405)
  • Health service research and pharmacy practice will be published in the International Journal of Pharmacy Practice

For more information about the submissions process and guidance visit the webpage here

Get help from the RPS in writing your abstract

  • So what is an abstract? An abstract is a concise summary of a project that allows readers to quickly identify its novelty, rigour and potential impact. Writing an abstract is an opportunity to share evidence widely and is a key component of most professional conferences; it is also an excellent starting point for those new to research looking to get their work recognised.
  • Writing winning abstracts. An abstract should be a summary of a project with a clear aim and concise design, method and results with meaningful conclusion.

Join us on September 7th for an instructional webinar to help prepare your abstract. The webinar will review abstract structure and give helpful tips on judging criteria and common pitfalls

Submit your abstract by 5pm GMT on 11 September or book now to secure your place at the Winter Summit 2017.