Don’t put off your pre-reg exam revision

Pre-reg revision course speaker, NadiaBy Nadia Bukhari, Senior Teaching Fellow & Pre-reg coordinator, UCL School of Pharmacy

Have you started thinking about your knowledge gaps and what your revision should look like between now and the exam in the summer? You may well think that the GPhC summer assessment is so far away that its too early to think about it now. However from my experience in working very closely with pre-reg trainees over several years, those who begin making plans in January are far more likely to pass the exam come June.

The best place to kick off your preparation for the assessment is at the RPS pre-registration revision course in London on the 26-27 January and there are several reasons for this.

As a mentor for emerging young leaders taking an active interest in their development and building their skills, I have an invested interest in pre-registration trainees getting the results they want when the GPhC release the results later in the year.

Don’t wait, get in early

Joining an RPS revision course early is the best thing you can do and this can really set you up for the remainder of your pre-registration year and beyond. This year, delegates will be allowed to take their mock exam papers away, which will be invaluable in helping to identify and address the knowledge gaps over the following months. You will also have a great opportunity to network and meet new peers who could be a really important part of your support or social network going forward, as well as the contact you will have with some of the top experts in pre-registration and early years pharmacy. These interactions should not be underestimated and the courses provide a fantastic platform for this.

What you can expect from the pre-reg revision course

The courses have been designed by a team of expert professionals to give pre-registration trainees a real taste for what the GPhC exam requires to pass and what it feels like to actually take part in one. Please take a look at an example programme.

The first day offers an intense overview of the exam contents and aims to bring everyone up to speed ready for the mini mock on day two. You will be taken through core topics such as, the essentials of pharmacy law and ethics, pharmaceutical calculations and high risk drugs and therapeutic drug monitoring.

The second day is a mini mock exam, sat in full exam conditions to give you the ideal preparation ahead of the real thing! This year, for the first time, you will be able to take the exam away so you can use it for your own revision at home.

Our revision courses have been a great success for many years now and the feedback is always great. We know that of our members who attended one of our courses last year, 91% of them went on to pass the exam. A previous delegate said that the course is “vital to knowing what to expect in the exam and how to plan forward revision”.

Don’t hesitate and book your place at one of the RPS pre-reg revision courses now to give yourself the best chance of passing the exam and making it to practice.

RPS Local in Scotland: Bringing RPS closer to you (Part 3, Interview with Lesley McArthur)

Lesley McArthurArticle by Lesley McArthur, RPS local coordinator for Forth Valley

I never know how to start these things, but here goes… Lesley McArthur (the concise version)… qualified 1989 (gasp) and worked in community pharmacy for the vast majority of my career. There’s not much I haven’t done in those 30 years, really, including recruitment, training, management, HR with a wee diversion into GP practice work. Lately, I’ve had a portfolio of work…

Read more RPS Local in Scotland: Bringing RPS closer to you (Part 3, Interview with Lesley McArthur)

Build a successful grant application

Successful grant application writer

by Justine Tomlinson, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust

Here is my experience in building a successful grant application. With a background in community pharmacy, and in terms of research I’d only ever been involved with company audit and practice questionnaires. Starting my PhD was a challenging experience for a number of reasons; the main one being that I needed to prepare a grant application for funding. I absolutely did not know where to start or what I required in order to give myself the best chances of being successful. It all felt rather overwhelming!

I decided to attend the RPS’ two-day Research Proposal Writing workshop (early 2017) facilitated by Professor Felicity Smith, to see what I could learn in the way of ‘grantsmanship’. The different sessions within the workshop touched on absolutely everything that I needed to know to begin building a successful application – from creating a sound research plan to enlisting co-applicants and utilising public and patient involvement effectively.

The small group size was great. This meant there was time to discuss everyone’s ideas and develop personal action plans. It was encouraging to be able to talk about my own research with like-minded individuals and get feedback from the RPS research team and Felicity. We also had the opportunity to speak with other pharmacists who had won grants and were embarking on their research journeys. Hearing from them was truly inspirational.

Following the workshop, the RPS research team have continued to provide an amazing amount of support. It took me four months to build my application for the NIHR Research for Patient Benefit competition. I put everything into practice that I learnt during the workshop and I am pleased to report that I have been successful at stage one of the competition. I am continuing to utilise the knowledge and skills from the workshop to build my stage two application (outcome due early 2018).

If you are struggling to get started with your research grant funding application then book onto our two day Research Proposal Writing workshop, led by expert Professor Felicity Smith of UCL School of Pharmacy.

 

Supporting you locally: A look at the year ahead

Jodie Williamson MRPharmS, Pharmacist at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society
Jodie Williamson MRPharmS, Pharmacist at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society

by Jodie Williamson, Pharmacist and Professional Development and Engagement Lead at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society in Wales.

We’ve had a busy year rolling out our RPS Wales local engagement model, bringing pharmacists together with our new local coordinators  to make sure we’re delivering the best support and networking opportunities for our members in Wales. Read on to find out more about our plans to support members locally, particularly how we’re going to helping everyone in Wales be Revalidation Ready!

 

Read more Supporting you locally: A look at the year ahead

Influencing policy and advocating for pharmacy in Wales

Elen Jones, Practice and Policy Lead, RPS Wales
Elen Jones, Practice and Policy Lead, RPS Wales

by Elen Jones, Practice and Policy Lead at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society in Wales.

We’ve had a busy year working with colleagues in NHS Wales and Welsh Government to put pharmacy at the heart of future healthcare planning in Wales, as well as working on policies to improve patient outcomes.

 

Read more Influencing policy and advocating for pharmacy in Wales

Pre reg revision course – my experience

Michelle, previous pre reg revision course attendee

by Michelle Clothier, Relief Pharmacist – Boots

When I first saw the advertisement for the RPS pre reg revision course event I was in two minds whether to go along. Half of me thought about the price and that it was far for me to travel, and the other half told me that it would be a good idea to go just to see how the exam would be laid out and get an experience of a pre-registration exam. Then a mock day came up in the city of Newcastle (close to my home) and I just knew that I had to go.

Day 1

I was really nervous the first day, particularly because I didn’t know many people there and partly because I knew my calculations were weak and I didn’t want people to notice my weakness. However, after the first day I quickly realised that I was not the only person worried about calculations and it gave me a glimmer of hope.

I arrived early and everyone was in good spirits, the check in process was quick and simple and I got my name badge and entered the hall. I sat on a table with only one other person I knew and we started working through the workbook provided. We were given the GPhC framework for the exam and lots of important learning materials including a list of the high risk drugs and everything you could ever need to know about them. Lunch was provided on both days (which was lovely and catered for everyone), and tea and coffee was flowing for everyone throughout the day. The main thing I learned on the first day was how to go about a number of calculations and I used the method I had written down to practice everyday until the exam. This is why the first day is so good! Methods are explained in detail and you are given time to write everything down so that you can use all of your notes for revision!

Day 2

This was the actual mock exam. I was tired (you don’t sleep much before the actual exam so this was perfect) and I was nervous despite it being a mock. It was clearly explained how the day was going to run and it was actually a perfect representation of how the actual exam did run. I didn’t pass the exam, but it gave me hope because I was quite close to the pass mark of 70%. As we marked our own paper I made a list of the points of which I got wrong so I could start to build my revision around them. You didn’t have to tell anyone the mark you achieved unless you wanted to.

Building up to the (real) assessment

After those two days, I used the framework given by the RPS and the points I had made to really start revising, and, despite failing the mock I passed the real thing!

I would highly recommend this mock to all pre-registration pharmacists. It is well worth the money because it is the foundation required to begin revision, it is an opportunity to mingle with other pre-regs who are all feeling as nervous as you are and you make new friends – all of who will be there with you and for you in your career in pharmacy. Don’t forget, no question is a stupid question – it is guaranteed that someone else in that room is wondering the same thing as you are.

The professionals from the RPS are there to share their knowledge and experience, ask your questions and learn as much as you can, take the resources and pass your exam. It sounds simple and perhaps cliche, but you get out what you put in and the RPS mock exam is the perfect opportunity to put in effort and get out knowledge and experience.

Honestly well worth it!

Visit the pre-reg revision courses events page to book your place today.

 

 

Antimicrobial resistance – how we can help you

By Professor Ash Soni, President of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society

Decades of inappropriate use of antibiotics, combined with a dearth of development and discovery of antimicrobials, has led to antimicrobial resistance (AMR) emerging as one of the most critical risks to global public health requiring action by governments around the world.

Each and every one of us has a role to play in meeting the challenge set by the UK Government in 2016 of reducing inappropriate antibiotic prescribing by 50%.

That’s why this year we focused providing professional resources to support you to help protect antibiotics for the future. Most are on our AMR hubpage but here’s a quick round-up in case you missed them: Read more Antimicrobial resistance – how we can help you

RPS Local in Scotland: Bringing RPS closer to you (Part 2, Interview with Annamarie McGregor)

Annamarie McGregorArticle by Annamarie McGregor, RPS Practice Development Lead

The RPS Local model has been created to enable greater 360-degrees of engagement between our members with the work of the RPS.

Aligning with NHS Board areas and having a local funded volunteer coordinator has already made this easier as we focus on developing a programme of up to five events per year in the first instance. My vision is that RPS Local brings the RPS Vision for pharmacists and strategic goals to reality by providing an opportunity to bring RPS Policies, Standards and Guidance to life in practical ways that will make a positive difference in day to day practice. Events will also be based on practice hot topics e.g. the identifying and reducing opioid analgesic dependence and will be a mixture of face to face and webinars. Read more RPS Local in Scotland: Bringing RPS closer to you (Part 2, Interview with Annamarie McGregor)

Winter Wellness

Jodie Williamson MRPharmS, Pharmacist at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society
Jodie Williamson MRPharmS

by Jodie Williamson, Pharmacist and Professional Development and Engagement Lead at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society in Wales.

We often hear about the pressures facing the NHS during the winter months but did you know that there are steps that we can all take to stay well this Winter that can help to relieve this pressure?

Read more Winter Wellness