Edward Frank Harrison – a pharmacy war hero

by Matthew Johnston, RPS Museum

If asked to list influential figures in the history of the First World War, few would probably know the name of Edward Frank Harrison. But it was Harrison who was responsible for saving the lives of thousands of Allied soldiers thanks to his work to combat the threat of chemical warfare.

Born in 1869, Harrison began his career as an apprentice pharmacist in North London aged 14. He was awarded the Pharmaceutical Society’s Jacob Bell Scholarship and won prizes in the subjects of chemistry, botany, and materia medica. He passed both the Minor and Major examinations at the Society’s School of Pharmacy and registered as a pharmacist in 1891. Read more Edward Frank Harrison – a pharmacy war hero

Pharmacists working to Eliminate Hep C

Andrew RadleyArticle by Andrew Radley, Consultant in Public Health Pharmacy, NHS Tayside

In 2016, the World Health Organisation advocated that Hepatitis C (HCV) could be eliminated as a public health problem by 2030.  The current WHO factsheet for HCV tells us that:

HCV is a liver disease caused by the hepatitis C virus: the virus can cause both a mild illness lasting a few weeks or a serious, lifelong illness that can be fatal.

The most common route to infection is through exposure to small quantities of blood e.g. through injecting drug use. Across the world, an estimated 71 million people have chronic HCV infection. Approximately 399 000 people die each year from HCV, mostly from cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.  Read more Pharmacists working to Eliminate Hep C

The Hanbury Botanical Garden: a pharmacist’s holiday destination in 1906

By Karen Horn, RPS Librarian

The Hanbury Botanical Garden is situated on the La Mortola promontory overlooking the Mediterranean. A glance at TripAdvisor  tells us that it is ‘spectacular,’ ‘a real gem,’ and ‘a beautiful, calm place with stunning views.’

What we are not told, though, is the garden’s connection to the Hanbury family and pharmacy.

Thomas, Daniel and the making of a garden

Daniel Hanbury was an enthusiastic traveller, taking every opportunity to further his research on materia medica. It was he who brought La Mortola to the attention of his brother, Thomas.  In March 1867, Thomas, a merchant in Shanghai, visited the area and found the ruined Palazzo Orengo with its neglected grounds and olive groves. Read more The Hanbury Botanical Garden: a pharmacist’s holiday destination in 1906

Drug-related deaths in Scotland 2017: How can pharmacy help?

Article by Fiona Raeburn, Immediate Past Chair, and Dr Carole Hunter, Current Chair, on behalf of the Scottish Specialist Pharmacists in Substance Misuse

This week the 2017 data for drug related deaths in Scotland was released.

The figures showed a further increase year on year.​ Sadly 934 people lost their lives. These deaths were preventable.

The Scottish Pharmacists in Substance Misuse group urge pharmacy staff across Scotland to think about the contact that they have with people who use drugs. Contact with community pharmacies in particular is often daily and presents opportunities to provide support, advice and encouragement as well as early warning signs that things are not going so well. Read more Drug-related deaths in Scotland 2017: How can pharmacy help?

Duty of Candour from 1 April 2018

When any new legislation is proposed part of my role is to see if there are any implications for the pharmacy profession. This can mean responding to consultations, engaging with members to gauge opinion, participating in advisory or short life working groups and working with civil servants and politicians to influence the proposals.

The new Duty of Candour regulations, which come into force on April 1st   this year, was one such area where we were invited to participate in a Scottish Government working group.The group consisted of a wide range of stakeholders and explored the issues that the new legislation would raise. This proved more challenging than originally anticipated and the changes were delayed to accommodate this. Read more Duty of Candour from 1 April 2018

Pharmacy Anywhere: the future of telehealth in Scotland

Article by Clare Morrison, Senior Clinical Quality Lead and Lead Pharmacist (North) at NHS Highland

What do you do when you need to offer pharmaceutical care across a huge geographical area but you only have a small team of pharmacists? You turn to telehealth.

NHS Highland has two distinct areas: the urban area around Inverness which is well served with community pharmacies, and a vast remote and rural area which is sparsely populated and, to a large extent, relies on dispensing GP practices. Read more Pharmacy Anywhere: the future of telehealth in Scotland

No you don’t need a PhD to pursue a career in the Pharmaceutical Industry!

Professor Luigi G Martini FRPharmS, FEIPG, Chief Pharmaceutical Scientist for the Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

Nor do you need to have done an Industrial pre-registration programme either! These are the two most commonly cited questions, or should I say myths, which are often directed at me.

So I have taken the opportunity in this blog to dispel a few myths as follows:

1) You do not need to have a PhD to work in industry, but it does help if you want to work in Research and Drug Discovery. However, there are many roles in Product Development, Manufacturing and Commercial which exist for pharmacists.

2) You do not need to undertake a pre-registration year in industry, and with only 11 such programmes in the UK, they are highly competitive and thus restricted with respect to demand. In fact, pharmacists who have trained and worked in community and hospital are highly regarded by the industry.

3) There has never been a better time to join the industry with pharmacists being highly desired for career paths in Medical Affairs, Regulatory Affairs, Pharmacovigilance and Quality Assurance.

Read more No you don’t need a PhD to pursue a career in the Pharmaceutical Industry!

RPS Local in Scotland: Bringing RPS closer to you (Part 5, Interview with Giovanna Di Tano)

Article by Giovanna Di Tano, RPS local coordinator for Lothian

Since qualifying in Pharmacy in 1982 from Strathclyde University, I have to date worked in community pharmacy. After moving to Edinburgh in 1985, I have juggled work whilst being a wife and a mother to three daughters. Read more RPS Local in Scotland: Bringing RPS closer to you (Part 5, Interview with Giovanna Di Tano)

The Hanbury Collection at the RPS Library

By Karen Horn, RPS Librarian 

(with painting of Daniel Hanbury)

Daniel Hanbury (1825-1875) was a leading British pharmacologist. Since 1892, his notable book collection, predominantly on pharmacognosy and botany, has formed part of the RPS Library collection.  So how do we come to own it and what are we doing to make it more accessible to members?

Thomas’ and Anna’s loss, our gain …

The Royal Pharmaceutical Society might never have been in possession of Daniel Hanbury’s books if his sister, Anna, had not moved house. Although his brother, Thomas, had intended to give them to the Society, he had found it difficult to part with them.  The books had been housed with Anna after Daniel Hanbury’s death in 1875, and her imminent move meant that a final decision had to be made about their future location. Read more The Hanbury Collection at the RPS Library

The history of cosmetics – unwrapped

By Matthew Johnston, RPS Museum

‘Removes blotches,’ ‘clears the complexion,’ ‘removes freckles, pimples, and all spots.’

Turn on your TV or open a magazine and you might see these words advertising the latest beauty product, but in fact they come from the Roman writer Pliny the Elder’s description of a substance called crocodilea – the dung or intestinal contents of a crocodile.

As well as its uses in skincare it was recommended as an eye salve, taken internally for epilepsy, and as a pessary for stimulating menstrual flow.

Partnerships
In 2016 the RPS Museum became a partner in a research project on ancient skincare, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council’s Science in Culture strand. Now, as the study reaches its conclusion, the team – including researchers from the Universities of Oxford, Glasgow and Keele – are going to showcase some of the findings in a series of events at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society on 15th and 16th  February. Read more The history of cosmetics – unwrapped