Women in early pharmacy

By Matthew Johnston, RPS Museum

“There is an impression that women are something new in pharmacy, but nothing could be further from the truth.”

These were Jean Kennedy Irvine’s words on her election as the first woman President of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society in 1947.

Medieval monasteries

In her speech, Jean also mentioned the early beginnings of community pharmacy in the medieval monasteries, where residents would grow medicinal plants to treat themselves and local people.

One of the oldest items on display in the RPS Museum is a stone mortar from a Spanish nunnery (AD 410-1500), used for preparing medicines. The Hanbury Collection of the RPS Library also contains a later copy of the ‘Physica’, a work by St Hildegard, Abbess of Bingen. Originally written in the 1100s, it outlines the medicinal properties of various drugs obtained from the natural world. Read more Women in early pharmacy

I am what I am! LGBT History Month

By Mike Beaman, FRPharmS, retired pharmacist

I am writing this blog in support of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society’s response to LGBT History Month.  Although not a gay activist I have, nevertheless, been generally open about my lifestyle since coming to terms with being a gay man back in the early 1970s.

I was born in 1947 so I was 19 and a university undergraduate when the legislation decriminalising homosexuality became law in 1967. I was already a young adult and therefore having an intimate relationship with another man before that time would have been a criminal act and would also have resulted in my being sent down from university and unable to eventually register as a pharmacist. Read more I am what I am! LGBT History Month

Biosimilar adalimumab is a test of shared decision making in the NHS

Co-written by the National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society, National Ankylosing Spondylitis Society, RNIB, Birdshot Uveitis Society, Psoriasis Association and Crohn’s & Colitis UK

The entry of new biosimilars and the creation of an NHS ‘local market of treatment options’ will see significant numbers of patients switched from the originator product, Humira, to one of four biosimilar alternatives this year.

Adalimumab is one of several biological drugs used in the treatment of autoimmune inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, non-infectious posterior uveitis, Crohn’s and colitis.

While some patients will take this in their stride, for others the change will be met with feelings of apprehension. Read more Biosimilar adalimumab is a test of shared decision making in the NHS

Polypharmacy – what is it and why is it important?

By Clare Howard, FFRPS FRPharmS, lead author of the RPS guidance Polypharmacy: getting our medicines right

What is polypharmacy?
We know that medicines have an enormous, positive impact on the lives of millions of people. But as more of us live longer, with multiple long-term conditions, we take more and more medicines. Taking many different medicines at once can become either a practical challenge or increase the likelihood of harm, or both.

Problems with polypharmacy happen when: 
• Medicines are prescribed that are no longer clinically indicated, appropriate or optimised for that person
• The harm of a particular medicine outweighs the benefit
• The combination of medicines being taken has the potential to, or is actually causing harm to the person
• Where the practicalities of using the medicines have become unmanageable or are causing harm or distress.  Read more Polypharmacy – what is it and why is it important?

A brief history of fake medicines: ancient Greeks and ‘trashy elixirs’

By Matthew Johnston, RPS Museum

On 9 February the Falsified Medicines Directive will come into force, making it harder for fake prescription medicines to reach patients. Although this is the latest piece of legislation to tackle counterfeit medicines, the problem is far from a new one.

For as long as branded medicines have been around, authenticity has been important. As early as 500 BC, priestesses on the Greek island of Lemnos supplied tablets of medicinal clay, stamped with a special seal while still wet, in order to guarantee they were the genuine article. Read more A brief history of fake medicines: ancient Greeks and ‘trashy elixirs’

Supporting and managing diabetes among the South Asian diaspora

How the pharmacy profession can play a huge role in providing effective support and care

Diabetes and the population

Type 2 diabetes is a preventable long-term condition which is currently highly prevalent and steadily increasing.

Research has shown that some ethnicities are at higher risk for developing the condition. South Asian people make up the second largest ethnic group in the UK, after the white population, and are at an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes in comparison. With the condition being up to six times more common in this ethnic group, it is a growing problem in the community.

“It is important that culturally appropriate advice is provided to those of South Asian origin”

The average age of onset in this group is 25, as opposed to 40 in the White population. There are a number of health complications related to diabetes, which include cardiovascular risk and mental health. It is therefore important that culturally appropriate advice is provided to those of South Asian origin, including advice about fasting, diet and exercise.

Read more Supporting and managing diabetes among the South Asian diaspora

Has Chris found a Peer?

Chris John talks you through peer discussion

Has a letter post-marked ‘Canada Square’ dropped on your door mat yet?  You know!  The one informing you that your CPD revalidation records have been selected for review by the GPhC (that’s if you revalidated for the first time at the end of October 2018).  No me neither. So I am getting on with planning my peer discussion so it’s ready (along with my 4 CPD records and reflective account) to be pinged to the GPhC by 31 October 2019. Read more Has Chris found a Peer?

Outside the comfort zone – getting involved in politics as an RPS member

by Elin Gwyn MRPharmS, Palliative Care Pharmacist, Betsi Cadwalladr Health Board

The latest meeting of the Welsh Assembly’s Cross Party Group on Hospice and Palliative Care was recently held at on Friday 23rd November. Royal Pharmaceutical Society in Wales asked me to attend the meeting on its behalf. With RPS having just recently launched its policy on palliative and end of life care, its engagement and membership of this group is very timely.

The purpose of cross party groups is to bring together groups and organizations with expertise in a particular policy area with Assembly members who are interested in the same area. The cross party groups don’t have power, but they are used to raise Assembly members’ awareness of issues related to the field so that they can scrutinise and challenge the government and the NHS more effectively.

Read more Outside the comfort zone – getting involved in politics as an RPS member

Rpharms.com – why so different?

We’ve been listening to your feedback about rpharms.com. You told us you love the content on the site, but it can be hard to find. You also told us some of the best bits of RPS membership are hidden and it’s not always clear what we do for pharmacy.

So, say “hello” to our new website – designed by…you!

The new site will give you a clear view about what we do and how we do it

Recognition. Development. Publications.

We’ve moved the good stuff to the top so it’s easier to find and navigate – you’ll find a consistent theme across the site, and all our communications.

  • We drive recognition of pharmacy through our campaigns to secure the future for the profession. We make sure your voice is heard across Government and in the media
  • Our publications, from the Pharmaceutical Journal, BNF, MEP and Pharmacy guides, help you provide safe and effective medicine use for your patients
  • We support your development at all stages of your career, from students, pre-reg’s, newly qualified and more experienced pharmacists, our development programmes match your career goals.

I’m really proud of what the team at RPS has achieved with the new site. We believe it’s clear and easier to use. Of course we will be updating and changing as we get feedback from you. We’ve also got further improvements planned to make the website experience even better. Let me know if you love the site, if you hate it, or if you have any suggestions about improvements @nealcpatel

World AIDS Day 2018: When a friend has AIDS

by John Betts, RPS Museum, Keeper of the Museum Collections

The history of pharmacy is usually thought of in terms of drug development and its ability to transform patient’s lives. Rarely do museums have an object in their collection that communicates what it was like to live with a life-threatening illness before there were any effective treatments.

The RPS Museum has a leaflet published by GMHC (Gay Men’s Health Crisis) in 1984, at the beginning of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, which does just that.

When A Friend Has AIDS provides advice to the friends of people living with AIDS on how they can offer them support.

Written with a great deal of compassion, it gives a moving insight into what living with HIV/AIDS was like at this time, from both the patient’s and friend’s point of view. Reading it never fails to move me to tears. Read more World AIDS Day 2018: When a friend has AIDS