How are new medicines developed?

Simon MacKay compressed for webBy Simon MacKay, Professor of Medicinal Chemistry, Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Strathclyde.

Every day we see stories in the media about new drug discoveries.  Medicines have revolutionised the treatment of disease, reduced the need for hospitalisation and surgery, and improved the quality of life of patients. Pharmacists and pharmaceutical scientists are central to the discovery of new drugs and the development of new medicines for the treatment of many conditions. But how do new medicines get discovered in the first place? Read more How are new medicines developed?

How medicines are made

By Yvonne Perrie, Professor in Pharmaceutics/Drug Delivery

A large number of medicines are currently available to treat a wide range of medical conditions. However, when we take a pill to treat a headache, or when we get vaccinated to prevent ourselves getting a disease, we rarely consider how much effort it took to develop the medicine. UK pharmaceutical scientists play a major role in creating new medicines, improving existing ones and ensuring they are used effectively.  This contributes not only to the health and wealth of the British nation, but also to improving health at a global level. Read more How medicines are made