How to ensure effective mentoring

Stephen Goundrey-Smith explains how pharmacists can benefit from mentoring and gives his recommendations for ensuring mentees and mentors get the most out of a mentoring relationship

Mentoring is a useful tool for those interested in career progression or simply anyone wanting support. 

Mentoring is a one-to-one relationship of professional development, usually between someone seeking professional progression and a more experienced practitioner. This could also include someone seeking to develop new expertise and a practitioner already active in that area.

Mentoring is different from coaching in that mentoring is concerned with professional development, rather than learning specific skills but many commentators argue that there is considerable crossover between the two.

Mentoring has been shown to have a positive impact on career development in healthcare, helping to improve confidence and interpersonal skills of mentors as well as mentees. It also improves career retention rates and work performance. Moreover, work among psychiatrists showed that mentoring greatly benefited professionals who worked in multidisciplinary teams or who were isolated from their peers in daily practice. Read the full article here

Find out more about RPS Mentoring and how it can help you.

Mentoring – a role for retired pharmacists

by Theresa Rutter, FFRPS FRPharmS

Most of us will have done some mentoring and many like me will have no formal qualification. I became interested after being mentored years ago by a non-pharmacist working towards a formal mentoring qualification. I found the process so useful that I wondered why it wasn’t embedded within the profession as a self-development tool.

Mentoring as a retired pharmacist

We retired pharmacists have the experience and skills to support the self-development of pharmacists at all stages of their career.

I started to mentor before retiring and have continued since with up to 6 mentees at varying intervals. They work in different sectors and levels of seniority.

Their areas of focus have included leadership, effective team work, staff management, prioritising, change management, problem solving, negotiating, influencing and work life balance.

The competencies (in the Advanced Pharmacy Framework) relating to these generic skills do not go past their expiry date.

I’ve found that career progression often means that mentees come to value satisfaction about their performance and recognition more highly.

Feedback from my mentees about their experience of mentoring

  • Mentoring provides a safe space and encourages them to explore options and find solutions to challenges
  • Retirees may have more time & flexibility to fit round the working hours of mentees
  • The empathetic relationship helps them to be honest about problems and areas for self-improvement
  • The sessions give them head space for reflection and creative thinking

What’s in it for mentors?

  • Stimulates neuronal pathways (use it or lose it)
  • The opportunity to share expertise and see mentees thrive is rewarding
  • It’s always good to get positive feedback

How you can get involved in mentoring?

It’s easy to sign up – RPS has launched a new mentoring platform which facilitates easy and appropriate matching of mentor to mentee. You need to reflect on the skills you can offer to the mentees, complete your profile and then keep an eye on your emails for requests from potential mentees, which you can either accept or decline.

For mentees, the same principles apply. They need to reflect on what they would like to get from a mentoring relationship and once registered can select a mentor based on their preferred profile of skills and experience, interest and local area (optional).

Sign up at www.rpharms.com/mentoring 

Our mentoring relationship

Being a mentee: Aamir Shaikh

I met my mentor Aamer Safdar whilst working at Kings College London. I was the 3rd year Professional Lead, and was introduced to him and he told me about his background, both personal and professional.  Just by listening to him, I knew that his values were similar to my own. 

Challenge

I now work at BUPA as the Chief Pharmaceutical Officer’s Clinical Fellow, but before that I worked within the Education Directorate at RPS.  It was there I worked alongside Aamer in projects involving undergraduates.  You will hear that pharmacy is a small world and this is one such example!  My manager explained how it is important to work alongside colleagues who will challenge your thinking and I found this in Aamer.  Our mentor/mentee relationship first established when we went out for dinner as a post-work group; it was here when I decided to formalise my mentor/mentee relationship with him. 

Benefits

I’ve benefited greatly from the mentor/mentee relationship. It’s given me thinking space but its been advantageous to both my personal and professional life to have someone to challenge my own thinking in whatever situation or scenario I am experiencing.  In our last meeting Aamer and I spoke about authenticity, congruence and integrity.  I found it particularly useful hearing from someone in Aamer’s position, a current GPhC Council member and previous RPS English Pharmacy Board member, about how important it is to stay true to your own values and what these values really mean.

We use the RPS mentor platform to record our meetings and have found that, as well as the normal methods of keeping in touch, the platform has been beneficial in keeping us focused. I couldn’t stress the importance of having a mentor enough.  It has really helped me focus whenever I have found myself in a sticky situation and I’m grateful for the time Aamer has shared with me.

Being a Mentor: Aamer Safdar

I have been a mentor to many people inside and outside of pharmacy and have used a variety of methods with my mentees which have included traditional face to face sessions as well as mentoring exclusively by email and by phone; in the latter two cases, I never met my mentees in real life until much later in our relationships! 

I currently mentor two pharmacists, at different stages in their careers, using the RPS mentoring platform.  The platform is useful because I have outlined the areas in which I would like to mentor in to manage my mentees’ expectations. 

Sharing experiences

In both of my meetings, we spoke about our careers and challenges at different levels and I was able to share my experiences and wisdom from both my day job and from being in national boards.  Much of my wisdom has come from my own mentors, who have been different people at different stages of my career,and with different perspectives and advice.  Without a mentor to bounce things off, I doubt I would have done many of the things I have done in my career.

Find out more about our mentoring scheme exclusively for members