It’s not business, it’s personal!

by Nicola Gray, RPS Regional Liaison Pharmacist

I have no doubt that the success of forthcoming integration across systems and sectors is going to be determined by the strength of personal relationships between stakeholders. Human beings crave connection with others above all else and the strength and authenticity of these connections will influence partnership working.

Making connections

These connections cannot be formed ‘on demand’. Sometimes people meet and immediately recognise a ‘soul mate’, personal or professional, but this is rare. And even then, we have to hope that the first flush of exhilaration for a strong new connection settles into something enduring and mutually enriching.

Developing relationships

I was recently a guest of Greater Manchester LPC at the NPA Conference in Manchester, and a thread about relationships became apparent across a number of presentations. Ed Waller from NHSE highlighted the importance of developing relationships and collaborative networks to enable community pharmacy to play its optimum role in PCNs. Simon Dukes from PSNC reflected on why partnerships fail, including lack of trust, stalemate, and the perceived power of one party over the other.

Later, Rose Marie Parr, Chief Pharmacist in the Scottish Government, countered that good relationships are built upon a shared vision, effective leadership and trust. Russell Goodway from Community Pharmacy Wales spoke of delivering a shared ambition through a willing partnership, and our own Paul Bennett spoke of unprecedented co-operation among representative bodies through aligning on the major issues facing pharmacists

Focus on what’s real

I think it is time to reflect on the strongest connections and most enduring, authentic relationships that each pharmacist has made – without exploiting them but focusing on mutual benefit. An obvious source of many enduring connections for pharmacy is with patients. How can pharmacists really tune into those connections to find out what is most relevant and valuable to their local population? Is that not the foundation on which our ‘offer’ to the local health system must be based? How, can we then share this common vision and facilitate strategic change at local level?   NHSE is sending a strong message through PSNC that a ‘tsunami’ of separate pharmacy approaches to PCNs will not be welcomed. What is needed is a coordinated effort from contractors within each locality.

Make use of support

We should also reflect on wider support from the pharmacy system that we can draw upon. From connections with colleagues in local hospitals, and our ‘academic hubs’ in our Schools of Pharmacy. Reminding us who we are, where we have been, and where we are going – not least with what we have to offer to the health system of our understanding of new medicines and new science. For those who already have strong and enduring relationships with multidisciplinary partners in primary care and beyond, try to anticipate the turbulence that they must also be experiencing and consider how you can help them to achieve shared objectives for your community.

So let’s take stock now of our best and most enduring connections, and pool our knowledge to make maximum impact when the time is right.

Our new resource on system leadership helps point the way. It includes case studies from pharmacists working in different levels of the system and links to tools, standards and guides to develop the leadership qualities required to work collaboratively across boundaries within your local health and care systems.

Diabetes care – get involved!

by Professor Mahendra G. Patel, Diabetes Lead, English Pharmacy Board

Today we’ve published our new policy ‘Using pharmacists to help improve care for people with Type 2 Diabetes’. Aimed at policy makers and service commissioners within the NHS in England, it calls for pharmacists in various care settings to be fully integrated into services for those with Type 2 diabetes. This makes way for increased prevention, earlier detection, and better access to diabetes care tailored to individual needs.  

More than five million people in the UK are expected to have Type 2 diabetes by 2025. This is a national challenge in terms of poor health outcomes, economic burden to the NHS, and ever-widening health inequalities largely driven by factors such as ethnicity and deprivation. Each year within hospitals, there are thousands of patients with diabetes experiencing medication errors that could be avoided.

Significant numbers of people are failing to meet the nationally recommended treatment targets in reducing risk of complications associated with type 2 diabetes. Many are not understanding their condition nor adhering to prescribed treatment. In my opinion, this is a critical time to make more effective use of the extensive clinical skills of the pharmacist.

The NHS Long Term Plan recognises the vital role of pharmacists and their clinical skills in supporting patients to achieve better health outcomes, improving patient safety and reducing medication errors. The recent establishment of new Primary Care Networks and the growing maturity of local Integrated Care Systems, together provide unparalleled opportunities for people to receive better access to their pharmacists, more personalised support, and joined-up care at the right time in the optimal care setting.

In line with new and emerging roles for pharmacists and advancing practice, and at a time when technology is set to command a pivotal role in healthcare, our new policy on diabetes builds on our previous national campaigns.

It translates the latest evidence into practice, focusing on helping people to live longer and lead healthier lives whilst ensuring effective and safe use of medicines. It further highlights the need to support services within and across different care settings, where pharmacists can make significant and meaningful differences in improving health outcomes.

It also shows how pharmacists, who are integrated within a specialist diabetes multidisciplinary team, can provide added value and synergy across care pathways as routine daily practice.

Professor Sir David Haslam, Chair of NICE, one of the many organisations supporting our policy states, ‘Diabetes is a public health emergency’. We will continue to press these recommendations to progress this crucial national work.

System leadership: how to get involved

By Amandeep Doll, RPS Regional Liaison Pharmacist

The NHS landscape is always changing and it can be difficult to know where to start for pharmacists who want to get involved in their local health and care systems.

You may have recently heard a lot about ‘systems’ in healthcare – but what are they really about? In short, they mean working collaboratively across health and social care boundaries to improve patient and public outcomes.

Current systems

The systems in England which plan, organise and deliver health and care services are called Integrated Care Systems (ICS), Sustainability and Transformation Partnerships (STPs) and Primary Care Networks (PCNs). The NHS Long Term Plan will be delivered through these systems, which will work in collaboration with existing commissioning, secondary care providers and local authorities.

Pharmacists must be part of these structures at leadership level to ensure the future success of the profession at every level of practice. Our impact in systems is maximised when we integrate with the wider health and social care team.

Our challenge

The challenge for pharmacists is to deliver system-wide medicines optimisation, creating a collective sense of responsibility across different areas of pharmacy, organisations and individuals. This has the potential to dramatically improve population health.

To do this, pharmacists must be formally recognised by these systems and a framework established to support pharmacy integration and build a collaborative approach.

But where on earth do you start? If you’re keen to get involved, we can help you explore leadership opportunities within healthcare.

We can help

Our brand new online tool A systems approach to medicines optimisation and pharmacy will help you navigate the opportunities for pharmacy service development and medicines optimisation within local health and care systems.

It identifies six ways you can support effective system leadership and is packed full of practical advice to encourage collaborative working. It also provides checklists of the resources, standards and guidance needed to build knowledge and skills, along with case studies of how pharmacists have improved medicines optimisation and patient care.

A systems approach to medicines optimisation and pharmacy is part of our support for members working to improve medicines optimisation. I really hope that other pharmacists will contribute their experiences and share good practice in this rapidly changing environment. We need to see what works and what doesn’t so we can all learn to lead better.

Why not submit your own leadership case study?

Download our case study template and email it to england@rpharms.com

Related resource: Medicines Optimisation

Supporting System Leadership

by Amandeep Doll, RPS Regional Liaison Pharmacist

I’m one of four Regional Liaison Pharmacists at the RPS, working on system leadership for pharmacy and medicines optimisation in England, delivering national strategy at a local/regional level.

We know there is a need to bridge the gap between the strategic and operational levels of healthcare and mobilise the profession to get involved with system leadership to improve health outcomes for patients. It’s vital to ensure that medicines optimisation and pharmacy services are considered core criteria when planning and implementing healthcare services.  Read more Supporting System Leadership