My career journey at Roche

By Ciara O’Brien, Medical Manager at Roche

 

There are many parallels that can be drawn between sectors of Pharmacy because as Pharmacy professionals, we all must adhere to the same standards of conduct. For me, this has meant seeking out and building on the core concepts in my day job – wherever that has been – to develop transferable skills that allow me to confidently bring the value of a pharmacist to any role. In particular, the quality, safety and regulation of medicines speaks to the Pharmacist role of medicines expert and the provision of optimised pharmaceutical based care with the patient at the centre.

I began my career with my GPhC registration from a community pre-reg and no idea what roles were available to me in the Pharmaceutical Industry but a desire to work there. I used job sites online and this lead to my first role at Roche as a Drug Safety Associate. I was able to demonstrate the core competencies and skills I had gained on the MPharm degree and from community practice in the interview. Having the pharmacy qualification meant I could transfer skills from clinical checks of prescriptions to medical review of adverse event cases. Read more My career journey at Roche

Chris’s Peer Discussion Blog

As I get older I think I’m becoming more last minute.com. I recently zapped my CPD records to the General Pharmaceutical Council – just in time for 31 October deadline.  Perhaps I should be more compare the supermarket.com?  Now I have revalidated for 2018 my mygphc.org account has re-set to what I need to do in the next 12 months. There are new things to think about.

I work at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS) as Head of Workforce Development looking at the standards, guidance, and policies that will develop our profession. Having been involved in the RPS approach to supporting its members with revalidation I thought I should write a blog about my own journey with staying on the register.  Each month I will cover different aspects of a new additional way us pharmacists have to keep our knowledge and skills up-to-date – the peer discussion.  The what, who, where and how. Read more Chris’s Peer Discussion Blog

My day with the English Pharmacy Board

by Sarah Browbank, Hospital Pharmacist and an RPS Ambassador

I’ve been fortunate enough to become an RPS Ambassador recently.  To do my best in my new role, I asked to attend the English Pharmacy Board meeting last week as an observer.  I feel it is important to understand how the RPS works.  Prior to taking on the Ambassador role, I felt I had some idea of what went on but really wanted to get under the skin and truly understand the activity and influence of the RPS.  I can only tell you how inspired, motivated and impressed I am by the work of the RPS and the committed staff that support our profession!   Read more My day with the English Pharmacy Board

Why should you attend the ‘Women in Leadership: Survive and Thrive’?

by Emma Davies, Advanced Pharmacist Practitioner and Research Fellow at Swansea University.

Women form the majority of the pharmacy workforce and yet, are still under-represented in senior roles across all sectors. This Women in Leadership event is looking to explore some of the issues faced by women working in healthcare and how we can work together to overcome them.

My contribution

I am looking to share my experience of workplace bullying and how I have tried to turn negative experiences into motivation to succeed. I am hoping that by being open about what I have faced, it will encourage people who may be going through a similar experience to know that it doesn’t have to continue or prevent them from realising their potential. I am looking forward to hearing from attendees about how they might have dealt with similar experiences and what I can learn from that to strengthen my future and those I support.  Read more Why should you attend the ‘Women in Leadership: Survive and Thrive’?

Join the RPS team!

 By Gareth Kitson, RPS Professional Development and Engagement Lead

My role at the RPS is vast and varied, it is a challenging but exciting post that allows me to connect with pharmacists across England.  One aspect of my role is to provide support to our RPS Local groups (Local Practice Forums).  RPS Locals help members engage with the RPS in their local areas.  They aim to give members the opportunity to meet others face to face, provide peer support and networking opportunities (extremely valuable for the upcoming revalidation requirements) and offer professional support to pharmacists regardless of their career stage.  In what other setting can a pre-registration speak to a newly qualified pharmacist about life as a practicing pharmacist, who can also talk to a chief pharmacist about their career pathway?  If you are not involved in your local group thenI’d encourage you to take a look at our website and find a group that is local to you and start to engage!

Since starting in post, I have heard that people are very passionate about the RPS but many members would like us to shout louder about all the great work that we do.  We can do this through a variety of ways, such as the website, emails or social media, however nothing substitutes face to face discussions.  Enthusiasm is infectious and we want people who are enthusiastic about THEIR professional body to help demonstrate the benefits to others and showcase the variety of tools and materials we create to help support all pharmacists.  I, like my colleagues, do this every time we meet a pharmacist, be they a member or not, but I want us to be able to do this as frequently as possible in as many different settings as possible.

Therefore, we’ve put our thinking caps on and created a new role – The RPS Ambassador.  This will be a new way of trying to reach out and engage with members across England.  This role is very varied and will primarily be introduced in areas of England that are geographically large, or areas where engagement opportunities exist and the RPS voice needs to be heard more frequently than we are currently able to support.  The ambassador will be affiliated with the local area in which they either work or live, to ensure that they understand the needs of our local members.  They will work closely with their own existing networks and with any other networks in their areas, including our RPS Locals to promote the excellent work of the RPS.  We would love to invite applications from pharmacists from a variety of backgrounds to represent the true breadth and depth of the profession and would love someone who is comfortable using and engaging with members and non-members on social media.
The role we have in mind can be found here. If you are self-motivated, passionate about pharmacy and also, passionate about the RPS then this role could be for you.  It will be a voluntary role, but we will set aside £1000 each year to say thanks for all your hard work and dedication.

We will provide you with all the resource you need to be a success, including presentations, printed materials and resources to showcase our work.   If you are interested in this role, please send us a CV and tell us something about yourself and how you can help us spread our good work. This might be a blog, a short video, a more traditional covering letter or anything else you think might catch our eye. Be innovative and original and show us your passion for the RPS!

Transforming outcomes: How pharmacy can play its part

Ahead of the 2018 FIP World Congress of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences in Glasgow, Scotland, Harriet Pike speaks to some of the key players behind the congress programme to find out what’s in store.

Wherever you practise, patients’ needs are changing. Advances in science and technology mean that individualised treatments can offer better outcomes than a “one-size-fits-all” approach. But there are challenges: new technologies often come with a hefty price tag, adding to the huge financial pressures already faced by health systems; practitioners are increasingly expected to emerge from their professional silos to collaborate for the benefit of patients; and the health workforce is not always a predictable resource.

The International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) wants pharmacists to be part of the solution. “It is the responsibility of each of us to transform and advance the profession to improve the health of our patients and nations,” says Lars-Åke Söderlund, head of national customers and new businesses at Apoteket AB, Sweden, and a member of the 2018 World Congress of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences programme committee. Read more Transforming outcomes: How pharmacy can play its part

Changing the way pharmacists learn

 Ahead of the 2018 FIP World Congress of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences in Glasgow, Scotland, Harriet Pike speaks to educators who are transforming the way pharmacists learn.

In the classrooms of The University of Sydney, Australia, students from a broad range of health disciplines are working together to solve complex, authentic, clinical cases. Medical trainees collaborate with diagnostic radiography students, who in turn discuss a patient’s drug history with pharmacy students, among others, each relying on the unique knowledge and skills of their peers.

Interprofessional education, while logistically difficult to organise, is an essential component of a health professional’s training, according to Timothy Chen, professor of medication management at the university and an interprofessional education champion. “To get the best outcomes for our patients, healthcare professionals must be able to work effectively in teams,” says Professor Chen, who will share his experiences of this way of learning at the 2018 FIP congress in Glasgow, Scotland. “Transforming outcomes” is the theme of the congress, to be held from 2 to 6 September, which will capture innovations in education that are helping pharmacists practise at the top of their game.

Interprofessional education makes perfect sense: as populations age and health interventions become increasingly complex, teams of specialists will be needed to affect the best outcomes for patients. And while pharmacists are already working in multidisciplinary environments, team work can be complex and complicated and does not necessarily come naturally.

Read more Changing the way pharmacists learn

My experience as an RPS English Pharmacy Board member

Sharon Buckle is Vice Chair of the RPS English Pharmacy Board and a Pharmacy Manager for Boots.

In June 2012 I was delighted to be elected onto the English Pharmacy Board. I was so honoured and so determined that we would be a bold, decisive and happening board, making a difference for our Profession.

If I could sum up in 3 words what is required of a board member, I would cite three characteristics:

  • Passionate
  • Persistent
  • Pragmatic

I made 3 pre-election pledges:
1/ to push for the sharing of patient records with pharmacists
2/ to fight for decriminalisation of single dispensing errors
3/ to raise the profile of pharmacists with Government, politicians and medics

In 2018 we are well on the way to delivering all three! Read more My experience as an RPS English Pharmacy Board member

Daniel Hanbury: family, the RPS and beyond

By Karen Horn, RPS Librarian

(with painting of Daniel Hanbury)

Daniel Hanbury’s family connections to the RPS extend back to the Society’s inception.  His father, Daniel Bell Hanbury, and uncle, Cornelius Hanbury, were both founder members of the Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain in 1841.  They were nephews by marriage of William Allen, the Society’s first president and, like other founder members, they were Quakers.

The Hanbury brothers and William Allen had further ties as business partners, along with John Thomas Barry, in the long-established pharmaceutical firm Allen, Hanburys and Barry – later Allen and Hanburys. Read more Daniel Hanbury: family, the RPS and beyond

Antimicrobial resistance – how we can help you

By Professor Ash Soni, President of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society

Decades of inappropriate use of antibiotics, combined with a dearth of development and discovery of antimicrobials, has led to antimicrobial resistance (AMR) emerging as one of the most critical risks to global public health requiring action by governments around the world.

Each and every one of us has a role to play in meeting the challenge set by the UK Government in 2016 of reducing inappropriate antibiotic prescribing by 50%.

That’s why this year we focused providing professional resources to support you to help protect antibiotics for the future. Most are on our AMR hubpage but here’s a quick round-up in case you missed them: Read more Antimicrobial resistance – how we can help you